favism


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favism

[′fä‚viz·əm]
(medicine)
An acute hemolytic anemia, usually in persons of Mediterranean area descent, occurring when an individual with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency of erythrocytes eats the beans or inhales the pollen of Vicia faba.
References in periodicals archive ?
Divicine has been strongly implicated as the causative agent in favism (Vicia faba anemia) [10], a hemolytic disease in humans particularly young males that have deficiency of erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-PD) activity [11].
Meloni et al, revealed that fresh fava bean is the major cause of hemolytic anemia in G6PD deficient patients like our study.16 Pollen of the fava beans also induced acute hemolysis in 5 patients (2.6%) that is in agreement with Schilliro17 whereas Katomis et al, never observed cases of favism that were induced by pollen inhalation.18 Infection is also a major cause of hemolysis in G6PD deficient patients.
Favism. It is recognized from the antiquity; patients present a clinical picture similar to the induced by drugs, that is triggered within the following 24 to 48 hours after the ingestion of faba beans.
Additional factors affecting digestibility of various legumes include: saponins, protease inhibitors, lathyrogens, phytohaemagglutinins, favism, and cyanogenic glucosides as reported by Gupta (1987).
Mediterranean peoples are especially susceptible to illness from fava bean consumption (a type of anemia called favism) because of a particular X-linked human gene.
In the following chapters, we travel to Sardinia where favism is still evident today (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency) and discover why the 'disease' became a buffer against malaria.
Its reported side effects include diarrhea, possible spontaneous abortion, and favism (acute hemolytic anemia) in individuals with hereditary glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.
It has a long list of reported side effects, including diarrhea, possible spontaneous abortion, and favism (acute hemolytic anemia) in individuals with hereditary glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.
After all, "Favism," a rare but potentially fatal reaction to eating fava beans, is based on a person's genetics.
In the 1950s, it emerged that an inherited deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, a red blood cell enzyme, caused this reaction, known as favism. Today, this enzyme deficiency is known to be a relatively common disorder among certain populations, and has subsequently been linked to sensitivity to a variety of drugs, particularly antimalarial agents and sulfa antibiotics.
The symptoms of favism usually disappear without treatment within a few days of exposure.