seizure

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seizure

Pathol a sudden manifestation or recurrence of a disease, such as an epileptic convulsion

Seizure

 

a pathological neuropsychic state that arises in an abrupt fitlike manner. Seizures frequently take the form of convulsions or other involuntary movements accompanied by clouding of consciousness. This stage is later replaced by a deep pathological sleep or stupor. Epilepsy, hysteria, and diseases of the brain can produce seizures. Seizures may occur in the form of a sudden relaxation of muscle tone (cataplectic seizure) or a sudden falling asleep (narcoleptic seizure). The term “seizure” is also used in the broader sense of paroxysm.

seizure

[′sē·zhər]
(medicine)
The sudden onset or recurrence of a disease or an attack.
Specifically, an epileptic attack, fit, or convulsion.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the pathogenesis is unknown, it may be related to prior infection or febrile seizures as a child.
Prophylactic paracetamol and ibuprofen are often used for relieving the discomfort of a febrile child; however, rigorous attempts to reduce the temperature with these drugs should not be recommended, as no evidence exists that this decreases recurrence of febrile seizures (Waruiru, 2004).
patients Any 1 (7) ([double dagger]) Respiratory disorders 0 ([double dagger]) Neurologic disorders 1 (7) ([double dagger]) Previous history of 2 (13) febrile seizures Days from influenza onset 1 (0-9) to life-threatening event (range) Days from influenza onset 1 (0-9) to death (range) Clinical signs, no.
These alterations often stem from prolonged febrile seizures, brain infections or trauma.
On &e other hand, there is evidence that increased levels of AVP released during fever may play a role in febrile seizures.
Primary infection with HHV-6 and HHV-7 has been linked to roseola and febrile seizures.
More serious infections can develop along with measles, including ear infections, sore throat, pneumonia, febrile seizures, and encephalitis (inflammation of the brain).
A new study in rats, however, indicates that prolonged fever-induced convulsions, or febrile seizures, cause long-lasting changes in the brain, perhaps rendering it more prone to epilepsy.
An increased incidence of febrile seizures in patients less than nine years old was associated with the 2010-2011 formulation, which prompted governing panels to recommend against administering Afluria to young children.
While febrile seizures are the most common neurologic adverse events following immunization with measles-containing vaccines, the risk is small - less than one febrile seizure per 1,000 injections.