female gaze

female gaze

the proposed creation of a counterpoint to the predominance of a ‘male GAZE’ in narrative cinema and western popular culture (Laura Mulvey 1975), in which women appear, for example, as sex objects. It was John Berger, the art historian, who said, ‘men look, women appear’. The proposal of Mulvey and others is that an objectification of women will only be overcome if women gain more control of the production of visual popular culture.
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Rodriguez weighed in on this, saying: "I think that the male gaze on the female body is very different [than] when you have a female gaze on this kind of scene, because I knew what was going to make me feel comfortable.
Here is a fantastic example of the difference between the male and female gaze.
What makes the film, Revenge (2017) interesting is that the director, Coralie Fargeat, is female and so the violence and the justice, one could argue, is the construction of the female gaze and raises potential questions about how the female might imagine justice (revenge) differently from the male.
In her first chapter, Creech revisits female desire in Egon Gunthers film Lot's Wife (1965) by applying theories of female gaze (Mulvey) and voice (Kaja Silverman) to the cinematic representation of a woman who seeks divorce because she doesn't love her husband.
In the all-women group show "The Female Gaze, Part Two: Women Look at Men," the topic is a great maw into which much (good) art is forked: figurative and gestural painting, photographs, sculpture, and embroidery, all spanning 1927 to 2016.
Eyes You Could Feel Not See': The Female Gaze in the Works of William Faulkner.
The female gaze is simply women starting to write, direct, produce, to be able to name and claim what they think is interesting, funny, sexy --and not have to have it go through the filter of a male producer, or a male network executive, a male distributor, who's going to go, 'Hold on a second, I don't really like her,'" says Soloway, 50.
It's a common case of warring gangs, drugs, gun crime and murder, but uniquely it's presented from a distinctly female gaze, and although it's unflinching in its gritty portrayal of Manchester, there are funny moments and tender passages that take the reader by surprise.
There are also unexplored power implications of men becoming objects of the female gaze, but she has amassed an impressive array of sources to convincingly demonstrate how "scarlet fever" could both serve and perturb the state.
However, the female characters do not only reject the objectification of the male gaze through active passivity: Murdoch establishes a female gaze, observing and defining the female characters and the narrator.
3) Because of this dominance, I focus on the female gaze in Linh's and Pham's films to contend that on display in their work is a powerful, desiring female gaze.
Presentations cover topics including religious terror, divorce, the female gaze, and African American drama.