femininity

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femininity

the characteristics associated with the female sex. The historical (often masculinist) study of femininity documents feminine identity linked to passivity nurturing, co-operation, gentleness and relation to motherhood, with an emphasis upon the relegation of women to the private sphere, the sphere of domesticity Feminists and sociologists have challenged the stereotypes relating to ‘femininity’, ‘feminine identity’ and the binary categories man/mind, woman/nature which dominate many conceptions of sexual difference, including the reduction of sociocultural processes to biological givens. For French feminist theorists (e.g. CIXOUS, KRISTEVA) ‘feminine’ is an arbitrary category given to woman's appearance or behaviour by patriarchy For Sue Lees (Sugar and Spice: Sexuality and Adolescent Girls, 1993), changing the social constructions of masculinity and femininity will mean a fundamental shift in our conceptions of femininity and MASCULINITY within the context of dominant conceptions of rationality and morality

Femininity

Belphoebe
perfect maidenhood; epithet of Elizabeth I. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
Darnel, Aurelia
personification of femininity. [Br. Lit.: Sir Launcelot Greaves]
Miss America
winner of beauty contest; femininity high among virtues desired. [Am. Hist.: Payton, 445]
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time, it is important to consider the extent to which women might remain constrained in their ability to redefine femininities, particularly in the highly gendered and heterosexualised spaces of the NTE, where they remain subject to a number of competing and contradictory scripts regarding "appropriate" dress and behaviour (Cullen, 2011).
Fully-funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the study consisted of semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 26 young women aged 18-25 who went on nights out with female friends in the city, exploring and discussing femininities in relation to appearance, drinking practices and risk management.
To me, queer femme-ininity can (but doesn't always) share affinities and express solidarities with Asian femininities that are read as 'less liberated' or more in need of 'protection' and with Black femininities that are read as 'angry' or 'unfeminine'.
Retaining a masculine ideal for bodies of flesh and knowledge and developing a commitment to relativising the state of (hegemonic) masculinity, gender studies has also given much more attention to masculinity than to femininities and far too often focused on femininity as a problem.
Although women's integration into the legal profession has grown considerably, women and their femininities continue to be suspect.
Furthermore, within their respective racial-ethnic communities, Chicana attorneys are expected to perform "heterosexual Chicana femininity." These femininities are accomplished through culturally gendered practices in their respective workplaces.
Between Femininities can be situated within that discursive space between post-structuralist theorizing pertaining to the influence of institutional and normative structures and the postmodernist privileging of girls' voices, resistance and agency.
Rather than presenting us with a concise map of the ethnographic journey, culminating in a defined range of discursive strategies that result in whole and distinct femininities, Gonick interrupts and punctuates her journey with theoretical asides that complement and inform the inserted extracts from transcriptions bearing the girls' voices.
Most studies on gender relations in organizations previous to Cheng (1996; 1997b) have been social-psychological and have not used sociological gender theory to define and distinguish the diversity of femininities and masculinities that exist.(2) Connell (1987; 1990) clarifies that "masculinity" and "femininity" are not singular, fixed, and dichotomous.
Emphasized femininity, on the other hand, is a kind of femininity that is in compliance with the prevailing pattern of femininity; which accommodates hegemonically masculine male interests and desires while preventing other femininities from gaining cultural articulation (Connell, 1987), an example of which would be iconic American television mothers of the 1960s and 1970s such as June Cleaver from "Leave it to Beaver," Carol Brady from the "Brady Bunch," or Mrs.
the politics of shame, Muslim veiling and "western" fashion); new femininities (e.g.
I don't believe this to be the case, but rather that we each uniquely engage in multiple femininities, some of which may even be playful or highly subversive.