feminist theory


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Related to feminist theory: feminism, Queer theory

feminist theory

a theory (see also FEMINISM) which, with the political and social changes of the 1960s and 70s, has challenged traditional conceptions of femininity and GENDER. As Humm (1989) points out, feminist theory ‘both challenges, and is shaped by the academy and society’. It has been, above all, characteristic of the explosion of recent theories, including the work of Hélène CIXOUS, Kate Millet (1970), Juliet Mitchell (1974), Sheila Rowbotham (1973) and many more, that these theories ‘describe the historical, psychological, sexual, and racial experiences of women’, not just academically, but as an indication of ‘how feminism can be a source of power’. Because of this, tensions have existed between feminist theory and sociology, especially given that it has challenged the fact that much sociology has been a sociology of men, stating mens viewpoints. But feminist theory, in so far as it is not always in itself sociology, has contributed to an important reconstruction of sociological perspectives in many areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other types of feminist theory, however, must be and in some cases have been, however mutedly, at work in the process of reform.
It is on these issues that Feminist Theory and International Relations in a Postmodern Era is the most theoretically ambitious.
. "'Woman's Era': Rethinking Black Feminist Theory." Carby, Reconstructing 3-19.
In her essay on a feminist history of theology, Sheila Briggs notes that feminist theory has often functioned under the "ideological shroud of male universalizations," failing to challenge the dominant theoretical models and concepts that construct the disciplines of history and theology.
However, Adams and Donovan take this ecofeminist axiom and apply it to the historical and actual connections between women and other animals, stating that feminist theory must engage itself with the status and treatment of animals.
Though the Field Day books are indebted to postcolonial and feminist theory, they themselves were criticized in Ireland for underrepresenting the writing of women--part of a "hidden Ireland" that is now to form the basis of a fourth volume of the anthology.
The title of this book may suggest that its intended audience is solely feminists, specifically American feminists, and that its topical concern is white racism in feminist theory. Such an impression would overlook related themes that animate Caraway's argument.
The theoretical frameworks presented include feminist theory, indigenous and human rights perspectives, environmental justice, black feminist epistemology, critically conscious pedagogy, queer theory, and even hip-hop pedagogies.
Contemporary feminist theory and activism; six global issues.
The intended audience is students in feminist philosophy or women's studies classes, as well as anyone with a general interest in feminist theory.
In so doing, she relies on current feminist theory, such as Judith Butler's concept of "gender performance" and Julia Kristeva's understanding of "abjection," filtered through careful bibliographical and textual study.
And further, support Cirksena and Culklanz's statement: "Instead of a unified perspective that can be called 'feminist theory,' many feminist theories share common elements" (WMM, p.