fencerow

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fencerow

Planting which forms a fence or is adjacent to a fence.
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Some of those stripping machines may still be found today, long forgotten in barns, sheds or fencerows. They might be labeled "Armstrong," "Armstrong-Carson" or "Carson," depending on the year of manufacture.
We quietly pushed qur doors shut and started to ease down the south fencerow toward the blind.
Remnant forested habitats were restricted to sparsely distributed fragments of varying shapes and sizes (typically <100 ha) and overgrown fencerows; contiguous forest habitat was limited to riparian areas along river corridors.
Stationwide; known from early successional habitats that includes meadows, old fields, fencerows, and brier thickets; widespread but not abundant at either site.
It's great for fencerows, sloughs and even a cut field if you add a second panel to cover your back.
That evening, I had my first of two sits in a ladder stand in the middle of a small fencerow that just looked like a great place to kill a deer.
Western Illinois harbors monster whitetails, skulking along fencerows and harassing estrous-enhanced does across stubbled cornfields.
I see this often in brushy fencerows and in Western riverbottoms lined with cottonwoods and overgrown homesteads--all big buck spots.
To get the most from nature, CSIRO research shows farmers need to conserve native vegetation on the farm and revegetate on-farm areas like fencerows. This works best alongside conservation efforts that connect the dots to create natural corridors and stepping-stones that help wildlife and ecological processes flourish.
According to Castro (2004) the origin of the vegetation corridors in Southern Minas Gerais can be connected to two different factors: One of them would be the linear strips of remnant vegetation left after clearcut in the forests to create boundaries between rural properties (also known as fencerows or headgerows).
Fencerows and landscaping were the most common locations where districts had trouble with weeds (Table 2).