Fenestra

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fenestra

[fə′nes·trə]
(anatomy)
An opening in the medial wall of the middle ear.
(medicine)
An opening in a bandage or plaster splint for examination or drainage.

Fenestra

A loophole in the walls of a fortress or castle, from which missiles were discharged: the ancient equivalent of a window.
References in periodicals archive ?
Udocx is a robust cloud based service from Fenestrae that captures valuable business documents and empowers organizations to automatically process and store documents in Office 365 or any other cloud-based repositories.
Therefore, the skull development of the American Mabuya presents differences with Trachylepis capensis in the development of pila antotica, the differentiation of the orbitosphenoid, the closure of pituitary and basicranial fenestrae, the ossification of parietal, and the development of vomer.
The species possesses fenestrae until the fourth ceratobranchial, and the fifth ceratobranchial is morphologically distinct.
Fenestrae, founded in 1990, is a global provider of innovative solutions that help organizations improve agility and reduce costs by eliminating paper from key business processes.
McCuskey, "The liver sieve: considerations concerning the structure and function of endothelial fenestrae, the sinusoidal wall and the space of Disse," Hepatology, vol.
These lipoproteins which adsorb endotoxins, when small enough pass through the fenestrae (Figure 1) to contact hepatocytes.
Darragh's experience spans 17 years in the technology industry, bringing a wealth of expertise to the position gained from a number of senior roles within international software companies; including BMC Software, SAP, Computer Associates, Network Associates and Fenestrae.
<<Immobilia autem sunt quae loco moveri non possunt, sive naturaliter ut domus, fodinae etc., sive civiliter, ut fenestrae, portae, statuae ad ornatum domus permanenter destinatae etc.
Common textures generated by mechanical compaction include thinning of laminate between, and draping over, concretions; flattening of burrows, fenestrae, gas-escape structures, desiccation cracks, and skeletal or detrital grains; rotated grains; spalling of coated grains; swirling structures; telescoping (conversion of grain-poor to grain-supported textures); and planar to curviplanar grain contacts.