fenestral


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fenestral

1. A small window.
2. A framed window blind of cloth or paper used prior to the introduction of glass.
References in periodicals archive ?
Initial, or fenestral, otosclerosis occurs in the area of the fissula ante fenestram, a vestigial embryonic cleft anterior to the oval window and stapes, and typically progress to involve the cochlear promontory, vestibule and otic capsule.
The abundance of fenestral structures suggests a shallow water realm ranging from intertidal to supratidal depositional facies (e.g.
[[alpha].sub.fen] is the ratio of the radius of contrast agent Gd-DTPA to the radius of fenestral pores ([[sigma].sub.fen] = r/[r.sub.fen]).
Observed sedimentary structures in the Jutana Formation is trough, herringbone, hummocky cross bedding and fenestral porosity [6].
This lithofacies pinches out northward to a feather edge just south of the center of the outcrop between strata assigned to the Fenestral Lithofacies.
The fenestral form will demonstrate a focal lytic plaque in the region of the fissula antefenestrum (Figure 16A).
Fenestral otoscierosis is the more common type, and it is thought to begin in the fissula ante fenestram (anterior oval window margin).' [1] In the lytic phase, the oval window can appear to be too wide on computed tomography (CT) as a result of the osteoclastic resorption of its margins (figure).
In the facies analysis we recognize eleven carbonate facies based on the dominance of different components (non-skeletal grains, and skeletal components) as well as the presence of distinct depositional textures and fabrics that can be grouped as: a) non-skeletal grain packstone-grainstone; b) fenestral mudstone-packstone; c) heterolithic stylonodular facies; d) microbialite and archaeocyath-rich thrombolitic microbialite; and e) bioclast-intraclast packstone-grainstone.
Despite their differences, osteogenesis imperfecta and cochlear otosclerosis are similar on computed tomography with respect to both fenestral and cochlear manifestations (figure).
The middle part of the sequence is composed of lime mudstones with algal laminations and the upper part of algal laminations occasionally with fenestral porosity and mud-cracks.
These mudstones and wackestones usually show intense bioturbation, fenestral porosity and incipient nodulization.
Bioturbation, planar lamination, fenestral structures and desiccation cracks are the most common sedimentary structures (Gonzalez-Pacheco, 1991; Hernandez-Romano, 1995; Aguilera-Franco, 1995; Aguilera-Franco et al., 1998b).