ferment

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ferment

Chemistry
1. any agent or substance, such as a bacterium, mould, yeast, or enzyme, that causes fermentation
2. another word for fermentation
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ferment

[¦fər¦ment]
(biochemistry)
An agent that can initiate fermentation and other metabolic processes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of microbial deterioration upon the juice fermentability depended on the juice sample and on the storage time.
Lee, Improvement of the Fermentability of Oxalic Acid Hydrolysates by Detoxification Using Electrodialysis and Adsorption, Bioresource Technol., 152, 444 (2014).
Vega noted that while fibers are most commonly categorized by their degree of solubility, there are many other characteristics that define fibers, such as degree of fermentability, which also imparts specific health benefits.
Starch and fiber fractions in selected food and feed ingredients affect their small intestinal digestibility and fermentability and their large bowel fermentability in vitro in a canine model.
Effect of different forms of alkali treatment on specific fermentation inhibitors and on the fermentability of lignocellulose hydrolysates for production of fuel ethanol.
For example, Stone reports the beer is brewed using a temperature rest that the brewers say accentuates the dryness and fermentability of the beer.
The fermentability of inhibitory lignocelluloses was improved using reducing agents like dithionite and sulfite [59].
[32] investigated the strategies that have been adopted to detoxify lignocellulosic hydrolysates and their effects on the chemical composition of the hydrolysates to improve the fermentability of lignocellulosics.
However, GM is a large molecular weight nondigestible polysaccharide and exhibits less fermentability by intestinal microbes than FOS.
the Chinese cabbage, cabbage, tomato, carrot, and spinach provide relatively higher fermentability than other vegetables (okra and gourds) because they have more fermentable saccharides [32].