ferric chloride


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ferric chloride

[′fer·ik ′klȯr‚īd]
(inorganic chemistry)
FeCl3 Brown crystals, melting at 300°C, that are soluble in water, alcohol, and glycerol; used as a coagulant for sewage and industrial wastes, as an oxidizing and chlorinating agent, as a disinfectant, in copper etching, and as a mordant. Also known as anhydrous ferric chloride; ferric trichloride; flores martis; iron chloride.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global ferric chloride for 2019-2024.
Ferric chloride (FeCl3.6H2O) in association with HCl was used as lixiviant in the present study.
Figure 1 shows the variation of electrical resistivity as a function of temperature of pure PPy samples with different oxidizing agents (ferric chloride and ammonium persulphate).
The report covers the current scenario and growth prospects of the global ferric chloride market for 2015-2019.
(2008) had studied the use of aluminum sulfate, ferric chloride and poly aluminum chloride in turbidity removal from drinking water.
Previous research suggests that various coagulants have been used for industrial wastewater treatment via coagulation process such as alum [21], ferric chloride [22], magnesium chloride [23], poly aluminum chloride [24], lime [25] and ferrous sulfate [26] for the removal of color [26, 27], COD [28, 31], turbidity [29] and TSS [30].
The chemical properties and the physical properties for alum and ferric chloride coagulants used for the coagulation process are tabulated in Table 2 and the physical properties of the polyacrylamide coagulant aid used in the flocculation process is also tabulated in Table 2.
Ferric chloride dosing would be ongoing constantly at various concentrations with greatly increased dosing required at the two peak flow times of each day.
The main products of the four companies include caustic soda, hydrochloric acid, sulphuric acid, hypochlorite, ferric chloride, water glass and ethanol/methanol.
A fourth method, a coagulation/filtration process, uses a ferric chloride liquid and an oxidizing agent such as sodium hypochlorite to create insoluble ferric hydroxide.
Around 600 litres of highly corrosive nitric acid, sulphuric acid and ferric chloride had leaked from a burst container.
The coagulants used included aluminum sulfate, ferric sulfate, and ferric chloride with dosages of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mg/l.