ferrite switch

ferrite switch

[′fe‚rīt ′swich]
(electromagnetism)
A ferrite device that blocks the flow of energy through a waveguide by rotating the electric field vector 90°; the switch is energized by sending direct current through its magnetizing coil; the rotated electromagnetic wave is then reflected from a reactive mismatch or absorbed in a resistive card.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the terms of the contract, financial details of which were not available, EMS is scheduled to deliver a ferrite switch and driver electronics to meet Thales Alenia Space's 2013 launch date.
The Tandem-rotator Reciprocal ferrite switch uses 0[degrees] and 90[degrees] total Faraday rotation states to achieve reciprocal connections to the desired ports.
Tenders are invited for: high power ka-band ferrite switch - expro+
The chief advantages of the ferrite switch are low insertion loss, high power handling capability and low DC power consumption.
(3-5) One of the more unusual applications was and still is for Dicke Radiometers, (6) where the ferrite switch introduces very little thermal noise.
Diode and mechanical switches have some disadvantages relative to ferrite switches. Diode switches, although faster switching than ferrite junctions, have non-linearities that produce intermodulation products if more than one frequency is present, and do not latch (thus requiring holding current).
Tender announced by EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY (ESA), France for High power x/ku-band ferrite switch - expro plus.
Given the targeted specifications the only technology that could meet the stringent requirements is the ferrite switch. However recent developments based on existing designs have shown that the power handling is a key issue that requires a radicallydifferent approach for the design of those power switches.
Hot switching is possible, as the ferrite switch will not be damaged by applied power during a switching event, which is on the order of 1 [micro]s.
Low cost, high volume (approximately 1000 units) waveguide circulator ferrite switches were chosen for the beamforming applications in the MMW region because they are compact; have relatively low losses ([less than] 0.3 dB), long lifetimes ([greater than] 100,000 hours) and reasonably good isolation (approximately 18 to 20 dB); and can tolerate a few watts of CW power easily.[4] The cost of a multijunction ferrite switch assembly can be as low as $100 per junction.[4] In fact, for high volume commercial applications (such as automotive radar), the cost per junction could be even lower.
this has been done so far with high power waveguide beam forming networks including ferrite switches as implemented for core h2o pre-developments.In this activity it is proposed to investigate reflector antennas fed by overlapped subarrays.
The basic circulator design is used for other applications as well, such as ferrite switches, isolators and phase shifters.