ferroelectric domain

ferroelectric domain

[¦fe·rō·i′lek·trik də′mān]
(solid-state physics)
A region of a ferroelectric material within which the spontaneous polarization is constant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Qin et al., "Two-dimensional structures of ferroelectric domain inversion in LiNb[O.sub.3] by direct electron beam lithography," Journal of Applied Physics, vol.
The polarization of a ferroelectric domain ([c.sup.+]/[c.sup.-]) has been found to have a significant effect on the surface properties.
Among the topics are the effect of ferroelectric domain on fatigue fracture behavior in piezoelectric ceramics, preparing bismuth copper-based perovskite-type ceramics and their piezoelectric properties, the microstructure of titanium oxide films for dye-sensitized solar cells, absorption characteristics of composite electromagnetic wave absorber made of sendust particles dispersed in a polystyrene resin, controlling the microstructure of potassium niobate porous ceramics and their sensor properties, and the crystallization of tungstenbronze phase and its inelastic light scattering in niobiophosphate-system glass.
For piezoelectric/ferroelectric materials, the AE method has been used to research ferroelectric domain reorientation processes [1], phase transitions [2], and to detect crack propagation and material fatigue [3-5].
In ferroelectrics, PFM allows direct imaging of ferroelectric domain structures with about 10 nm resolution as well as their evolution during phase transitions, ferroelectric fatigue, domain wall motion, and relaxation.
A few examples of specific topics discussed include single grain Yba2Cu3Oy porous ceramic superconductors, progress in ferroelectric domain engineering at the micro/nanoscale, improving thermoelectric device performance and durability through the integration of advanced aerogel-based ceramics, sol-gel routs to nanostructured patterned ferroelectric thin films with novel electronic and optical properties, and transparent conducting properties in layered oxychalcogenides.
Klug et al., "Three-dimensional ferroelectric domain imaging of epitaxial BiFe[O.sub.3] thin films using angle-resolved piezo response force microscopy," Applied Physics Letters, vol.
The ferroelectric domain structure can be imaged by variety of techniques such as electron microscopy techniques, optical microscopy and X-ray techniques, and scanning probe microscopy including piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) [5, 6].
Between these eight possible different polar domains in BiFe[O.sub.3] [[+ or -] 1 [+ or -] 1 [+ or -] 1] there are three possible types of ferroelectric domain walls 71[degrees], 109[degrees], and 180[degrees] degrees typical of rhombohedral crystals.
Ferroelectric domains -- ie, the regions with oppositely oriented direction of polarization -- were directly visualised in freshly-cleaved WTe2 single crystals.
The observed SHG intensity profile verifies the existence of fine structures (ferroelectric domains) in multiferroic LiNb[O.sub.3] nanocrystals ceramic material.
Defects in the copolymer can hinder the formation of large ferroelectric domains in the P(VDF-TrFE) copolymer, converting the copolymer into the relaxor ferroelectric, leading to a higher dielectric constant.