ferroelectric domain

ferroelectric domain

[¦fe·rō·i′lek·trik də′mān]
(solid-state physics)
A region of a ferroelectric material within which the spontaneous polarization is constant.
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Among the topics are the effect of ferroelectric domain on fatigue fracture behavior in piezoelectric ceramics, preparing bismuth copper-based perovskite-type ceramics and their piezoelectric properties, the microstructure of titanium oxide films for dye-sensitized solar cells, absorption characteristics of composite electromagnetic wave absorber made of sendust particles dispersed in a polystyrene resin, controlling the microstructure of potassium niobate porous ceramics and their sensor properties, and the crystallization of tungstenbronze phase and its inelastic light scattering in niobiophosphate-system glass.
For piezoelectric/ferroelectric materials, the AE method has been used to research ferroelectric domain reorientation processes [1], phase transitions [2], and to detect crack propagation and material fatigue [3-5].
The vibro-AE activity is discussed by comparison with ferroelectric domain related AE and AE generated by failures.
The measured AE activities are supposed to be due to the ferroelectric domain reorientation related to stress reduction.
As the observed peaks are much larger than those in disk sample, the micro-cracking and stress reduction at the interfaces between active and inactive layers rather than ferroelectric domain reorientations are supposed to be the origins of AE.
Different from the disk sample, the AE related to ferroelectric domain reorientation does not appear in the first polarization switching.
The AE method is used to determine the ferroelectric domain behavior in the disk PZT samples.
In ferroelectrics, PFM allows direct imaging of ferroelectric domain structures with about 10 nm resolution as well as their evolution during phase transitions, ferroelectric fatigue, domain wall motion, and relaxation.
In ferroelectric materials, the DC bias induces polarization switching, and the size of the ferroelectric domain formed below the tip is related to a change in the electromechanical response detected at a probing frequency of about 10 kHz - 2 MHz.
A few examples of specific topics discussed include single grain Yba2Cu3Oy porous ceramic superconductors, progress in ferroelectric domain engineering at the micro/nanoscale, improving thermoelectric device performance and durability through the integration of advanced aerogel-based ceramics, sol-gel routs to nanostructured patterned ferroelectric thin films with novel electronic and optical properties, and transparent conducting properties in layered oxychalcogenides.
Defects in the copolymer can hinder the formation of large ferroelectric domains in the P(VDF-TrFE) copolymer, converting the copolymer into the relaxor ferroelectric, leading to a higher dielectric constant.
Most of the 16 contributions in the 2006 edition of the annual series review recent research on porous and colloidal materials, ferroelectric domains, and hydrogen in metals and semiconductors.