fetal alcohol syndrome

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Related to Fetal alcohol effects: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

fetal alcohol syndrome

(FAS), pattern of physical, developmental, and psychological abnormalities seen in babies born to mothers who consumed alcohol during pregnancypregnancy,
period of time between fertilization of the ovum (conception) and birth, during which mammals carry their developing young in the uterus (see embryo). The average duration of pregnancy in humans is about 280 days, equal to 9 calendar months.
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. The abnormalities include low birthweight, facial deformities, and mental retardation, and there appears to be an association with impulsive behavior, anxiousness, and an inability on the part of the affected children to understand the consequences of their actions. When some but not all of these abnormalities are present, they are referred to as fetal alcohol effects (FAE). FAE has been observed in children of mothers who drank as little as two drinks per week during pregnancy. FAS affects 1 to 2 babies per 1,000 born worldwide. Many require constant lifelong supervision and end up institutionalized because of dysfunction in the family. FAS was first defined as a syndrome in 1973, although it has been observed for centuries. See also alcoholismalcoholism,
disease characterized by impaired control over the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Alcoholism is a serious problem worldwide; in the United States the wide availability of alcoholic beverages makes alcohol the most accessible drug, and alcoholism is the most
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.

Bibliography

See M. Dorris, The Broken Cord: A Family's Ongoing Struggle with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (1989).

fetal alcohol syndrome

[‚fēd·əl ′al·kə‚hȯl ‚sin‚drōm]
(medicine)
A spectrum of changes in the offspring of women who consume alcoholic beverages during pregnancy, ranging from mild mental changes to severe growth deficiency, mental retardation, and abnormal facial features.

fetal alcohol syndrome

a condition in newborn babies caused by excessive intake of alcohol by the mother during pregnancy: characterized by various defects including mental retardation
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers at Spectrum and DeVos Children's Hospital, also in Grand Rapids, found that 95% of children thought to have fetal alcohol effects also had psychiatric or behavioral disorders and that 89% had a first-degree relative with a psychiatric or behavioral disorder.
Neuropsychological deficits in fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects.
Neurotrophic Properties Influence on Factors Fetal Alcohol Effects Insulin-like Growth Effects on cell Significantly Factor metabolism and mitigated motor growth; promotes impairments in vivo; proliferation, increased neuronal differentiation, and survival in vitro; maturation of neurons and promotes neuronal and glia; reduces viability in vitro apoptosis (e.
In a long-term study of 415 patients born with fetal alcohol syndrome or fetal alcohol effects, Dr.
Possible fetal alcohol effects (FAE) indicates that alcohol is being considered as one of the possible causes of a child's birth defects.
Miller says it suggests that similar developmental defects in the brains of human fetuses probably underlie the symptoms in children with fetal alcohol effects.
Terms used to describe individuals within the overarching category have included FAS, partial FAS (pFAS), alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND), fetal alcohol effects (FAE), and alcohol-related birth defects (ARBD) (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2009 b).
Over the years, a number of terms have been used to describe these alcohol-attributed effects, including partial FAS, fetal alcohol effects, alcohol-related birth defects, and alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders, with the Institute of Medicine providing some standardization in their 1996 report (Stratton et al.
The IHS case file consisted of patients in whom FAS was diagnosed or who were designated as having fetal alcohol effects (FAE) by a physician during 1985-1992.

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