fetal alcohol syndrome


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fetal alcohol syndrome

(FAS), pattern of physical, developmental, and psychological abnormalities seen in babies born to mothers who consumed alcohol during pregnancypregnancy,
period of time between fertilization of the ovum (conception) and birth, during which mammals carry their developing young in the uterus (see embryo). The average duration of pregnancy in humans is about 280 days, equal to 9 calendar months.
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. The abnormalities include low birthweight, facial deformities, and mental retardation, and there appears to be an association with impulsive behavior, anxiousness, and an inability on the part of the affected children to understand the consequences of their actions. When some but not all of these abnormalities are present, they are referred to as fetal alcohol effects (FAE). FAE has been observed in children of mothers who drank as little as two drinks per week during pregnancy. FAS affects 1 to 2 babies per 1,000 born worldwide. Many require constant lifelong supervision and end up institutionalized because of dysfunction in the family. FAS was first defined as a syndrome in 1973, although it has been observed for centuries. See also alcoholismalcoholism,
disease characterized by impaired control over the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Alcoholism is a serious problem worldwide; in the United States the wide availability of alcoholic beverages makes alcohol the most accessible drug, and alcoholism is the most
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.

Bibliography

See M. Dorris, The Broken Cord: A Family's Ongoing Struggle with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (1989).

fetal alcohol syndrome

[‚fēd·əl ′al·kə‚hȯl ‚sin‚drōm]
(medicine)
A spectrum of changes in the offspring of women who consume alcoholic beverages during pregnancy, ranging from mild mental changes to severe growth deficiency, mental retardation, and abnormal facial features.

fetal alcohol syndrome

a condition in newborn babies caused by excessive intake of alcohol by the mother during pregnancy: characterized by various defects including mental retardation
References in periodicals archive ?
What needs to be understood is that fetal alcohol syndrome creates something like a lump of unusually pliable clay out of which many things can be formed.
Verbal learning and memory in children with fetal alcohol syndrome. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 20(5):810-816, 1996.
Records of the Meeting of the National Task Force on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal ,Alcohol Effect.
By 1983 the Benson textbook deemed avoidance of alcohol "best," an occasional beverage "okay," and it cautioned that "excessive intake may cause Fetal Alcohol Syndrome." [34] Within a relatively short period, FAS had gone from a medical discovery to a medical problem.
Referral and diagnosis for fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) can be made throughout the lifespan.
Neuropsychological deficits and life adjustment in adolescents and young adults with fetal alcohol syndrome. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 16:380, 1992.
Today, out of each 10,000 children born in the United States, between 3 and 30 suffer from fetal alcohol syndrome. These babies are small at birth, with distinctive facial features, including a flattened area between the nose and upper lip, narrow upper lips, small eyes and noses, and narrow foreheads.
This suite of characteristics became known as fetal alcohol syndrome. Fetal alcohol exposure also causes more subtle problems.
Seventy-five percent of the infants had facial features typical of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. In addition.
Infant mice that had been exposed to alcohol in the womb also showed some symptoms of human fetal alcohol syndrome, such as a lower body weight and smaller skulls.
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Alcohol Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder.
Bledsoe, MD, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Larry Burd, PhD, North Dakota Fetal Mcohol Syndrome Center, Grand Forks, North Dakota; Tom Donaldson, National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Washington, DC; Daniel Dubovsky, MSW, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Center for Excellence, Rockville, Maryland; Sheila Gahagan, MD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Marian Kummer, MD, National Committee of Children with Disabilities, Billings, Montana; Carole M.

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