maturity

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maturity

[mə′chu̇r·əd·ē]
(geology)
The second stage of the erosion cycle in the topographic development of a landscape or region characterized by numerous and closely spaced mature streams, reduction of level surfaces to slopes, large well-defined drainage systems, and the absence of swamps or lakes on the uplands. Also known as topographic maturity.
A stage in the development of a shore or coast that begins with the attainment of a profile of equilibrium.
The extent to which the texture and composition of a clastic sediment approach the ultimate end product.
The stage of stream development at which maximum vigor and efficiency has been reached.

maturity

A measure of the developing of strength in concrete; combines the effects of curing temperature and time of hydration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fetal lung maturity is followed by AFOD surge culminating in the onset of labor.
Amniotic Fluid Lamellar Body Count: Cost-effective Screening for Fetal Lung Maturity.
Amniocentesis for lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio to assess fetal lung maturity was deferred because of oligiohydramnios.
Because steroids for fetal lung maturity have been administered, and given improvement in her pulmonary edema and a footling breech presentation for Twin A, cesarean delivery is performed.
Over the last 40 years, several FLM tests were developed and used clinically for the assessment of fetal lung maturity.
Assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of the TDx-FLM II to predict fetal lung maturity.
CONCLUSION: Perinatal mortality can be prevented by optimum care of mother and fetus in antenatal period, prolonging the duration of gestational age as far as possible till fetal lung maturity is attained.
Beginning with specimen collection and transportation and then from the pregnancy test, to the delta 450, cell counts, transfusions, and microbiology cultures, to the fetal fibronectin, the fetal lung maturity tests, and more, all the way to sensitive autopsies, laboratory professionals journey with the mothers, their babies, and their families.
Best-obstetrical-practice recommendations advise against prelabor elective delivery before 39 weeks, unless fetal lung maturity has been demonstrated.
The assessment of fetal lung maturity (FLM) in these pregnancies is sometimes necessary, but the ability to utilize current methods in the presence of increased bilirubin concentrations is unclear.
Until data from a clinical trial show a favorable risk-benefit ratio, physicians should not give multiple steroid doses in an attempt to hasten fetal lung maturity the 16member panel decided.
With regard to the Fetal Lung Maturity assay, alternatives are still being assessed, including alternative technologies, and no retirement date has been communicated.