transplant

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Related to fetal tissue transplant: Fetal Tissue Research

transplant

Surgery
a. the procedure involved in such a transfer
b. the organ or tissue transplanted
References in periodicals archive ?
The different areas where fetal tissue transplant has shown promise are noted below.
5, 1988 NIH panel holds last meeting and finalizes conclusion that fetal tissue transplant research is "acceptable public policy.
As for Albert Brooks' decision to have a fetal tissue transplant, Drane said it's common for a person, when personally confronted "with the complexities of a particular situation," to "move to the center" on an emotionally-charged issue.
While the molecular mechanisms discussed above in brief can explain the mechanism of transplant rejection of an adult organ, the phenomenon is far from clear so far as the hypo-immune or pre-immune fetal tissue transplant survival mechanism in adults is concerned, at least over a one month period of observation in the present set of experiments in HLA randomized hosts without any concommitent immunosuppressive drug support to delay rejection.
13] Accordingly, they would ban all tissue transplants from related persons and deny the donor the right to designate the recipient of a fetal tissue transplant.
The "main effect" of the trial, a self-rating by the study patients of their degree of improvement (if any) revealed no difference between those who received a fetal tissue transplant and those who underwent a "sham" operation, in which an identical hole was drilled in the skull, but was not followed by a fetal tissue injection.
As it turns out, a number of patients from both the placebo group (sham surgery) and the group that received a fetal tissue transplant felt remarkably better after the operation.
5 million for a fetal tissue transplant project at the University of Colorado using the bodies of abortion victims.
The statement is obviously false; fetal tissue transplants have been attempted since the 1920s, yet with largely dismal and sometimes catastrophic results for the patients.
Contributions also tackle such debated issues as fetal tissue transplants, harvesting of organs from patients in permanent vegetative states, and xenotransplantation of organs from other species.
Human trials of stem cell transplants have barely begun, and therapies are merely hoped-for; just as gene therapy and fetal tissue transplants have largely failed to live up to their promise, SCNT and stem cell transplantation may never achieve therapeutic validation or use.
Sasai said the SDIA technique offers "a practical alternative" to controversial fetal tissue transplants that occasionally are used to treat Parkinson's.