fiber, dietary

fiber, dietary,

bulky part of food that cannot be broken down by enzymes in the small intestine of the digestive system. Almost all natural fiber comes from plants. Although fiber has little nutritional value, it offers other health benefits. By adding bulk to the diet, fiber prevents constipation, minimizes intestinal disorders, and may serve as an aid in dieting. The benefits of consuming foods high in fiber include lower blood levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. Foods high in fiber include legumes, green, leafy vegetables, whole fruits, and unrefined foods such as bran and sprouted seeds. Fiber is also known as roughage. Robert L. Ory, Grandma Called It Roughage: Fiber Facts and Fallacies (1991).
References in periodicals archive ?
The Utah study tested males and females seperately for the effects of crude fiber, neutral detergent fiber, dietary fiber, starch and ash on their digestive systems.
His research interests include dietary influences on colon cancer and cholesterol metabolism, dietary fiber, dietary fat, bile acid metabolism, and dietary treatment of diabetes and chronic pancreatitis.