fibrocartilage

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Related to fibrocartilaginous: fibrocartilaginous joint

fibrocartilage

[¦fī·brō′kärd·əl·ij]
(histology)
A form of cartilage rich in dense, closely opposed bundles of collagen fibers; occurs in intervertebral disks, in the symphysis pubis, and in certain tendons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reports of fibrocartilaginous embolism in horses have described asymmetric lesions that were limited to the cervical intumescence (WALLING et al., 2011), differently from what was observed in this case.
The fibrocartilaginous structure of the articular disc the course of the movements of the collagen bunches and the distributions of the elastic fibers were similar to those in the literature (Gillbe 1973 1975; Kabak 2002a).
One example is a fibrocartilaginous embolism, also called spinal cord stroke, which occurs when the gel-like cushion between veterbral discs moves into the spine and blocks blood flow.
Hough Jr., "An organ culture model for assaying wound repair of the fibrocartilaginous knee joint meniscus," American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol.
In many cases, these segments are held together by means of a cartilaginous or fibrocartilaginous bridge.
The menisci are crescent-shaped fibrocartilaginous tissues whose structural organization consists of dense collagen bundles that are locally-aligned but show a continuous change in macroscopic directionality.
The groove for the peroneal tendons is formed by a fibrocartilaginous cushion, which deepens the osseus depression on the posterior side of the lateral malleolus.
Focally, islands of cartilage may be present (fibrocartilaginous dysplasia).
The new tunnel technique involves soft tissue preparation prior to symphyseal (fibrocartilaginous fusion between two bones) block graft.
A spinal stroke or fibrocartilaginous embolism (FCE) occurs when an obstruction or clot blocks the spinal cord's blood supply, resulting in a loss of mobility.
After grafting to the femur head, the mesenchymal cells of the membranous bone of the skull are able to change to the articular cartilage with hyaline nature, and this hyaline cartilage can bear the mechanical stresses of weight better than fibrocartilaginous and also does not degenerate under stress.
As a result, an intratendinous, fibrocartilaginous thickening or sesamoid (os peroneum) forms at the cuboid notch to shield the peroneus longus from the increased force at this location (Coughlin, 1999; Sammarco, 1994).