fibrositis

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Related to fibromyalgia: rheumatoid arthritis, Lupus

fibrositis

inflammation of white fibrous tissue, esp that of muscle sheaths
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fibrositis

[‚fī·brə′sīd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of white fibrous connective tissue, usually in a joint region.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Women More Susceptible It isn't clear what causes fibromyalgia, but research suggests it may result from an imbalance of brain chemicals that causes the brain to experience pain more intensely.
Conclusion: Patients with fibromyalgia had a better course of illness when their education and socio-economic status were in good condition, and the complications of pain and illness were further reduced.
Consuming nutrient-dense sources of magnesium and zinc should be part of any healthful diet, and may hold some promise for fibromyalgia. Magnesium is found in whole grains, green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, and beans.
Fibromyalgia typically occurs in those between 20 and 60 years of age, although it has been observed in children.
Fibromyalgia is characterized by moderate to debilitating widespread pain.
These findings suggest that it may be possible to use a molecular signature to develop a diagnostic test for fibromyalgia. The next step is a larger clinical trial with a more diverse population and additional controls.
The UTMB team of researchers, along with collaborators from across the U.S., including the National Institutes of Health, were able for the first time, to separate patients with fibromyalgia from normal individuals using a common blood test for insulin resistance, or pre-diabetes.
Fibro-Family is a local support group for people living with chronic pain, especially fibromyalgia, but welcome sufferers of other similar chronic pain conditions.
"We found clear, reproducible metabolic patterns in the blood of dozens of patients with fibromyalgia. This brings us much closer to a blood test than we have ever been," Hackshaw said.
"We don't have good treatment options for fibromyalgia, so identifying a potential treatment target could lead to the development of innovative, more effective therapies," says study co-author Marco Loggia, PhD, with the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at MGH.
Fibromyalgia is a chronic debilitating disorder that affects 1-10% of the population, mostly women.