fibrositis


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Related to fibrositis: myositis

fibrositis

inflammation of white fibrous tissue, esp that of muscle sheaths
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fibrositis

[‚fī·brə′sīd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of white fibrous connective tissue, usually in a joint region.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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A large and consistent body of literature suggests that TCAs may have specific beneficial effects in the following: peptic ulcer disease, [7-10] irritable bowel syndrome, [5,11] muscle contraction headache, [6,12] migraine headache prophylaxis, [4,6,13] urinary incontinence in adults, [4,5.14] insomia, [15] chronic pain syndromes, [4,16-19] chronic pelvic pain, [20] chronic low back pain, [21-26] rheumatic pain, [6,27-29] fibrositis and fibromyalgia syndromes, [30-31] and neuropathic pain.
7, 2018) (explaining the medical community treating fibrositis as a psychological problem during the late 20th century).
They began talking, the subject of fibrositis came up, and the Brigadier informed our hero he should take Kruschen salts in hot water or tea every morning for at least five weeks.
The antecedents of this verbal exchange relate to Miller being a fighter pilot during the war, while Bradman never went to battle, as he suffered fibrositis, a nervous muscular complaint, and had been discharged from the army in 1941.
Sleep-related myoclonus in rheumatic pain modulation disorder (fibrositis syndrome) and in excessive daytime somnolence.
* Relieving pain and inflammation of sprains and strains, rheumatic pain, sciatica, backache, fibrositis, muscular aches and pains, joint swelling, and stiffness.
* Mathie states, 'The weight of evidence currently favours a positive treatment effect in eight [areas]: childhood diarrhoea, fibrositis, hayfever, influenza, pain (miscellaneous), side-effects of radio- or chemotherapy, sprains, and upper respiratory tract infections.' Ninety-three studies were evaluated (14).
It was first described in 1955 by Konwaler et al, who called the lesion subcutaneous pseudosarcomatous fibromatosis, t In the early 1960s, the disease became known as nodular fasciitis; other terms used in the literature include proliferative fasciitis, infiltrative fasciitis, productive fasciitis, subcutaneous fibromatosis, and nodular fibrositis.