hyperplasia

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hyperplasia

(hī'pərplā`zhə): see hypertrophyhypertrophy
, enlargement of a tissue or organ of the body resulting from an increase in the size of its cells. Such growth accompanies an increase in the functioning of the tissue. In normal physiology the growth in size of muscles (e.g.
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.

Hyperplasia

 

an increase in the number of structural elements of tissues or organs. In man and animals, hyperplasia is based on the intensified reproduction of cells and the formation of new structures. Hyperplasia is observed in various types of pathological growth of tissues (chronic productive inflammation and tumor), in regeneration, and in hypertrophy. Hyperplasia often carries with it compensating characters. In plants, it may be a local growth of tissues resulting from mitotic or amitotic cell division. It occurs with infection by destructive or pathogenic organisms, during trauma, and under the influence of growth stimulants, pesticides, and other preparations. The result of hyperplasia is the formation of galls, calluses, and warts.

hyperplasia

[‚hī·pər′plā·zhə]
(medicine)
Increase in cell number causing an increase in the size of a tissue or organ.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) The authors examined more than 2,000 specimens in a group of fibrous hyperplasias, and 108 met their criteria for this "new" lesion which they called GCF.
After distinguishing GCF among fibrous hyperplasias, Weathers and Campbell further elucidated the structure of the lesion when they studied them under light microscopy.
Conclusions from a study by Reibel, (5) as well as one by Savage and Monsour, (6) disputed the distinction of the lesion as a separate entity among fibrous hyperplasias and tumors.
Fibrous hyperplasias are considered reactive proliferations of fibroblastic tissue rather than neoplastic proliferations.
(16) Though the GCF is very similar histologically to other fibrous hyperplasias, clinical features may aid in dintinguishing it from other lesions.
In spite of similar histology, several distinctions can be made between a number of fibrous hyperplasias according to characteristics such as age distribution, gender predilection, location and etiology.
Color and vascularity of lesions can also be distinguishing features when diagnosing fibrous hyperplasias. Most irritation fibromas are of normal mucosal color, unless traumatized, in which the lesion could appear reddened, or whitish due to hyperkeratinization, the result of continued irritation after development of the lesion.
Although most fibrous hyperplasias are relatively innocuous lesions, histologic examination of the tissue is necessary in most cases to rule out the possibility of malignancy.