fibula

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fibula

(fĭb`yələ): see legleg,
one of the paired limbs of an animal used for support of the body and for locomotion. Properly, the human leg is that portion of the extremity between the foot and the thigh. This section of the human leg contains two long bones, the tibia and the fibula.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fibula

 

a metal clasp that was used in ancient times to fasten clothing and, at the same time, served as an ornament. Fibulae of various shapes and designs were widespread from the Bronze Age to the early Middle Ages. The fibula consisted of a pin, a bow, a groove, and a spring, which joined the pin to the bow. In archaeology, fibulae play an important role in dating. Fibulae made of precious metals inlaid with precious stones often serve as fine examples of the ancient art of jewelry-making.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

fibula

[′fib·yə·lə]
(anatomy)
The outer and usually slender bone of the hind or lower limb below the knee in vertebrates; it articulates with the tibia and astragalus in humans, and is ankylosed with the tibia in birds and some mammals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fibula

1. the outer and thinner of the two bones between the knee and ankle of the human leg
2. the corresponding bone in other vertebrates
3. History a metal brooch resembling a safety pin, often highly decorated, common in Europe after 1300 bc
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The fashion of wearing a few beads hanging from individual fibulae was known in the sixth century in the Carpathian Basin (Csallany 1942).
(27) For example, there are no II D fibulae on the fortified site at Nikadzimava near Horki in eastern Belarus, which has produced "Slavic" bow fibulae otherwise known from hoards of bronze and silver in the Middle Dnieper region (Sedin 1994; 2000).
The same is not true for the pair of fibulae from grave 172 in Kosewo, which share five near neighbours with the fibula from grave 55 in Suuk Su.
There are 5 fibulae of Werner's class II D in the Koziivka hoard, and another of his class II C.
Of particular significance is the absence of any similarity relations between Boki and sites in those two regions, which produced II D fibulae. (31) Janis Ciglis has noted, on the other hand, that grave 23 in Boki illustrates a number of remarkable changes taking place in the material culture of the lands around the confluence of the Daugava and Aiviekste rivers in the late sixth and early seventh century, many of which are linked to a new form of status representation through funerary rituals (Ciglis 2001, 63).
Like the Boki fibula, the one found in Jagala has no near-neighbour links to other members of Werner's class II D found in the Middle Dnieper region, although it looks remarkably similar to one of the fibulae from the Trubchevsk hoard (Fig.
Despite the lack of securely dated archaeological contexts, the vast majority of fibulae with scrollwork decoration may well be of the sixth century.
PRODUCTION OF "SLAVIC" BOW FIBULAE AND THE EMBLEMIC STYLE
The plotting of the clustering analysis of the brooches examined in the present study shows that fibulae found in the Lower Danube region have multiple finks to brooches from distant areas, including Mazuria and Asia Minor (see Fig.
This is certainly the case with a soapstone mold for bow fibulae, recently found in association with other smelting implements in a sunken-featured building at Bernashivka, near Mohyliv Podils'kyi (Ukraine).
What exactly did "Slavic" bow fibulae "say" about their users?
(105) The Tigani grave produced no fibulae, and the associated buckle and earrings point unmistakably to a model of "aristocratic" female burial different from that at Nea Anchialos but common in the Mediterranean area.