fiction

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fiction:

see novelnovel,
in modern literary usage, a sustained work of prose fiction a volume or more in length. It is distinguished from the short story and the fictional sketch, which are necessarily brief.
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; short storyshort story,
brief prose fiction. The term covers a wide variety of narratives—from stories in which the main focus is on the course of events to studies of character, from the "short short" story to extended and complex narratives such as Thomas Mann's Death in Venice.
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fiction

1. literary works invented by the imagination, such as novels or short stories
2. Law something assumed to be true for the sake of convenience, though probably false
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
When literature is at the center of attention, I think there is valuable work to be done by specifically investigating fictionality as a choice, a resource, and a rhetorical strategy, and by asking why an author employs or refrains from employing fictionality.
Gallagher also eventually acknowledges as much, writing, "in the case of many novel characters, even the 'type' was generally minimized by the requirement that the character escape from the categorical in the process of individuation." (7) Nevertheless, Gallagher's acknowledgment both of the burden of type and the escape from it omits any details that might give us a clear picture of how that escape from the categorical happens, especially in novels like Tom Jones that do not depict the highly particularized inferiorities that she and others name as crucial both to fictionality and to the process of individuation.
The metanarrative function of the intradiegetic narrator, reinforced by the narrative metalepsis, highlights the novel's fictionality.
From the modern perspective, the romance author's efforts to define and delimit his text's fictionality may seem excessive.
Even when a work of art is defined by its fictionality, a certain share of essential properties remain: a great portion of dialogue, for instance, points to the fictionality of a text and is not expected in a work of astronomy or economics, and the same is true for interior monologue, irony of the narrator, structural symmetries, etc.
Perhaps a troubling dramatic side effect of this concentrated emulation, however, is the disconnect between Hamlet's fictionality and his functionality.
Shakespeare's deliberate exposure of fictionality in this play culminates in the image of Hermione, who as a "painted icon-woman reverses the rhetoric of iconoclastic discourse by exposing a living, chaste woman rather than a mortified strumpet" (190).
Central to this trajectory is the problem of cultural relativism which is intimately associated with the distinction between fictionality and non-fictionality made between traditional Chinese poetry and its Western counterpart.
To the extent that realist novels usurped the mantle of fictionality and everything else was declared "insufficiently or faultily fictional," English literary history today, he contends, continues its search for "lookalikes in the past" (25).
One of the theses of 'Raymundo Mata' is that we're shaped by the 'Noli.' It's that sense of ourselves as a fiction, the fictionality of the Filipino, which I think is the reality of the Filipino.
So on the one hand, Marling maintains that, far from doing the ideological work scholars typically expect Hollywood films to do, these films actually reveal the fictionality of normative, regulatory masculinity.