fiction

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fiction:

see novelnovel,
in modern literary usage, a sustained work of prose fiction a volume or more in length. It is distinguished from the short story and the fictional sketch, which are necessarily brief.
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; short storyshort story,
brief prose fiction. The term covers a wide variety of narratives—from stories in which the main focus is on the course of events to studies of character, from the "short short" story to extended and complex narratives such as Thomas Mann's Death in Venice.
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fiction

1. literary works invented by the imagination, such as novels or short stories
2. Law something assumed to be true for the sake of convenience, though probably false
References in periodicals archive ?
Plato's philosophical dialogues also depict events fictionally. Viewed in this light, stressing the fictional aspect of literature and ignoring its formal aspects, Calame functions as an Aristotelian critic, joining the Neo-Aristotelians/Chicago critics as against the New Critics of the twentieth century: it is plot (mythos) not language that makes literature--"the Greek idea of a poetic product as an artifact that creative mimesis turns partly into fiction and partly into a reference to reality seems very modern.
The couple are loosely based on Edward and Margaret Chambre Hardman, whose Rodney Street studio-home (fictionally transposed to Slater Street) was saved by the National Trust after a Daily Post campaign.
They were by no means Cixous's first texts mentioning Algeria, although her later works seem to refer more explicitly to the location of inaugural scenes at the origin of her writing, that early books, such as Inside (1969, translated into English in 1986), had addressed more obliquely, or more fictionally. Cixous generally contests the autonomy of autobiography, generalizing the implication of the self in any text, regardless of its genre, or, conversely radicalizing the notion of fiction so as to encompass autobiography.
The impact this had on female writers such as Austen is presented in Mansfield Park (1814) which articulates fictionally Wollstonecraft's concept of a rational woman in the figure of Fanny Price.
Helene, e, Ho kanenas (1998), her fourth, is similar in fictionally expanding historical material but different in concentrating on the problems of women and also in employing narrative techniques common circa 1900--50 in Western Europe.
But while I found "The Story" to be entertaining, I was left with the question I am often left with when newspaper reporters are portrayed fictionally: Who are these people?
The (attempted) rebuilding of a cultural German identity from literal and metaphorical ruins can then be fictionally treated from various angles.
Director Pam Cowey says: "The fun of this racing about is increased by the staging device of super-imposing both homes on one set, so that actors inches apart are fictionally in two different places."
The Jerusalem-to-Ramallah route that Rana takes fictionally is itself the subject of the second of Abu-Assad's works in the festival: the documentary Ford Transit.
Tighe taught in Poland during this era and is a prominent scholar of Polish literature, but the book does not fictionally bottle his actual experience.
Nonetheless, Preston admirably proves her thesis: that in describing--and fictionally violating--a stultifying elite culture she knew intimately, Wharton traces a movement from Old World order to modernist disorder.
In the second half of the first act, in the fictionally constituted part of the performance, the central panels slid open to frame a large projection screen that filled the top two thirds of the vertical space, leaving the bottom third as three anchor desks of a television studio.