fictitious

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fictitious

[fik′tish·əs]
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Pertaining to or measured from an arbitrary reference line as in fictitious equator, fictitious latitude, or fictitious longitude.
References in periodicals archive ?
Referring to himself as just another member of a collective group of veterans, his words, those of the men and women he served alongside, and their inherent sincerity are actually juxtaposed against two of the most maligned sources of fictitiousness during the Vietnam era; the Hollywood scriptwriter and the Washington speechwriter.
These components of financial profit evince varying degrees of 'fictitiousness,' and they must therefore be treated cautiously in the calculation of the 'financial rate of profit' and in assessing trends in the 'real' ARP.
To demonstrate the fictitiousness of gender, I pointed to Song's masquerade and Gallimard's ability to "buy into it" and directed attention toward Gallimard's internal conflict between perceived notions of reality versus fantasy.
The concept has been criticized as slippery because it is built on an irrational idea of "contagion." It is considered an illegitimate figure marked by overidentification and thus by fictitiousness, fraud, and appropriation (Gary Weissman, Phantasies of Witnessing: Postwar Efforts to Experience the Holocaust [Cornell U.
Conceiving of the classic and its canonicity as never standing as it was in any specific past history, Coetzee postulates the necessity of remodeling it by intertwining fact and fictitiousness, one of the signature strategies in his writing.
Abundant details--carefully designed fictive accoutrements, sleek in their form and with surfaces impeccably finished to fetishistic standards, as well as the calculated tension in the aligned connecting cables--contribute to the fictitiousness of the ise-en-scne.
This comic stock character of seventeenth-century Spanish drama exhibits the fictitiousness of the mythological universe in various ways, ranging from his scenic ubication (in the margins of the scene or perhaps even in the stalls, (43) crossing over into the space inhabited by the spectator, addressing him, and thus oscillating between intra- and extra-dramatic perspectives), (44) to his plot function (burlesque mirror image or countertype of the noble characters), (45) and witty and coarse manner of discourse (debasing the hero's tragic stature and jeopardizing the elevated status and credibility of the mythical universe.
The effect of these notes, and the intrusion of an often anonymous, disinterested commentator, is to further emphasize the novel's fictitiousness.
In fact it is in its fictitiousness that the story of Waheed's Nowgam village could well be anywhere in Kashmir.
And how strange that readers should demand "severe fidelity to real life" of a fiction that by its very fictitiousness can provide "more reality, than real life itself can show." (9)
Mother Goose rhymes, fairy tales, and narratives of magic had all been condemned by American educators such as Samuel Griswold Goodrich, who considered fantastical works to be "monstrous, false, and pestilential," so corrupting of children's morals that he believed they threatened "to make criminals of a large part of the children who read them." (32) Denounced both for their fictitiousness and their violence, fairy tales and fantasy narratives seemed to educators at best a waste of time and, at worst, an incitement to the very wickedness and barbarism they so fantastically depicted.
The author himself, however, dismisses all doubts about the fictitiousness of the story at the beginning, stating in the very first sentence that the following sheets contain the "unaccountable Facts," supported by "the Affidavits of several Persons of undoubted Credit...which the reader will here find properly inserted." (7) According to the contents page, it is clear that the only part of the text one can refer to as to autonomous authorial narrative (the one in fact written by Benjamin Victor himself and not merely transcribed) is what remains after setting aside all the judicial documents, which leaves the reader with only a tiny untitled part of the book, notably the fifty-two-page long beginning, the conclusion (202-208) and some linking paragraphs in between.