Fideism

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Fideism

 

the affirmation of the priority of faith over reason, which is characteristic of religious world views based on revelation. Fideism limits the sphere of scientific activity and denies the importance of scientific knowledge with regard to the world view, assigning a key role in the comprehension of the world to religious faith. Fideism is characteristic of many trends in idealist philosophy. According to V. I. Lenin, idealism is “merely a subtle, refined form of fideism” (Poln. sobr. soch., 5th ed., vol. 18, p. 380).

References in periodicals archive ?
Like fundamentalist fideists today, the skeptics viewed the conflict of dogmas from the sidelines and despaired of joining any particular team with confidence.
Like fideists, skeptics accept that not all reasons can be grounded empirically.
In his review of Mary Ward's Robert Elsmere (1888), he described "those who are quite sure [the sacred story] is false" as "unphilosophical through lack of doubt." (21) For the older Pater, as for Renaissance fideists like Montaigne, doubt offered the firmest foundation for religious faith.
The author seeks to return the Latitudinarians to the context in which they originated, seeing them as trying to come to terms with the painful legacy of the political and religious turmoils of the mid seventeenth century and as seeking to defend and reinvigorate the Church in the face of challenges from sectarian enthusiasts, Catholic fideists, antimonians and academic skepticism.
But the proponents of standard models of objective justification claim that Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein are fideists, who leave no ground on which to justify religious belief at all and thus evacuate religious claims of any cognitive significance.
Catholics are not fideists; instead, they stubbornly reflect upon the data of revelation, drawing out their implications and seeing their interrelationships.
Because tradition is separated from any sort of rational reflection, this implies that those who favor the alternative of tradition are necessarily fideists, while those who embrace reason are rationalists (in the neutral sense of the word).
First, at least in part due to his misreading of Polanyi on tradition, the pre-Virtue MacIntyre accuses Polanyi of being a fideist. While there is a sense in which Polanyi is correctly characterized as a fideist, this is not, as MacIntyre claims, due to the separation of tradition and reason.
Here the objections of rationalists, anti-rationalists, and fideists are considered.
Some Catholics have become fideists, who believe what Christ teaches through his Church but find no strong basis for this in philosophy and human reason.
Meier can only assert his fideist thesis about faith by quoting modern Protestant theologians.
It is not about Schmitt to the extent that it is pressed into the service of Straussian fideist propaganda.