fiduciary

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fiduciary

(fĭdo͞o`shēĕ'rē), in law, a person who is obliged to discharge faithfully a responsibility of trust toward another. Among the common fiduciary relationships are guardian to ward, parent to child, lawyer to client, corporate director to corporation, trustee to trusttrust,
in law, arrangement whereby property legally owned by one person is administered for the benefit of another. Three parties are ordinarily needed for the relation to arise: the settlor, who bequeaths or deeds the property for another's benefit; the trustee, in whose hands
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, and business partner to business partner. In discharging a trust, the fiduciary must be absolutely open and fair. Certain business methods that would be acceptable between independent parties dealing with one another "at arm's length" may expose a fiduciary to liability for having abused a position of trust. Thus, in an ordinary business transaction the prospective purchaser of land need not inform the seller of an imminent rise in realty values, but one buying land from a partner must disclose such information. In many cases courts will treat an unexplained profit derived from a fiduciary relationship as an instance of constructive fraudfraud,
in law, willful misrepresentation intended to deprive another of some right. The offense, generally only a tort, may also constitute the crime of false pretenses. Frauds are either actual or constructive.
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fiduciary

Law
1. a person bound to act for another's benefit, as a trustee in relation to his beneficiary
2. 
a. having the nature of a trust
b. of or relating to a trust or trustee
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, chief executive officers are held fiduciarily responsible for annual report accuracy, thus the letters to shareholders may be attributed to top managers as a group (Salancik & Meindl, 1984).
Profit-sharing plans are permitted to invest any portion of their portfolios in employer stock, but may do so only if the investment is fiduciarily sound.
Chief executive officers must sign the letters and are held fiduciarily responsible for their accuracy, so, at a minimum, they can be assumed to have final say over their contents.