field changes

field changes

[′fēld ‚chānj·əz]
(meteorology)
With regard to thunderstorm electricity, the rapid variations in the vertical component of the electric field strength at the earth's surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the magnetic field changes all the time, so does declination at any given location.
Using a system-on-a-chip SDR approach, in lieu of the traditional fixed application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design, enabled the platform to make rapid real-time field changes, an important capability in an evolving threat environment.
By connecting field data with decision makers, maintenance and operations personnel will now have even faster access to field changes and an accurate audit trail for compliance and analysis requirements, it said.
As the sound field changes, so does the shape of the light beam.
From each sample's isothermal M(H) curves, the respective [DELTA][S.sub.M](T) curve was determined by applying (1) to each of the five field changes, and the results are shown in Figure 6.
"These findings could offer an explanation for the bizarre fluctuations in magnetic field direction seen in the geologic record around 600 to 700 million years ago," Driscoll said. "And there are widespread implications for such dramatic field changes."
Cook could do little wrong as captain in England's 169-run win in the first Ashes Test, a series of bowling and field changes kept paying off.
These are some of the first observations of how an asteroid's magnetic field changes in time, notes planetary scientist Ben Weiss (MIT), who was not involved in the study.
When Jupiter's magnetic field changes, the aurorae on Ganymede also change, "rocking" back and forth.
Unlike a bar magnet, however, Earth's magnetic field changes over time because it is generated by a geodynamo (in Earth's case, the motion of molten iron alloys in its outer core).
The scientists predicted that, in the next two years, Voyager 1 would cross the current sheet, the sprawling surface within the heliosphere where the polarity of the sun's magnetic field changes from plus to minus and if it would detect a reversal in the magnetic field, it would prove that it was still within the heliosphere.
The entrances to the north and south routes are far enough apart that the magnetic fields at each location differ considerably and, because the Earth's magnetic field changes gradually over time, in some years the north entrance is a closer magnetic match to the mouth of the river while, in other years, the south entrance is a better match.