parvovirus

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parvovirus

parvovirus (pärˌvōvīˈrəs), any of several small DNA viruses that cause several diseases in animals, including humans. In humans, parvoviruses cause fifth disease, or erythema infectiosum, an acute disease usually affecting young children. Symptoms include a rash that spreads from the cheeks (hence the common name slap-cheek disease) to the extremities, low fever, fatigue, and, in adults, mild to severe joint pain and swelling. Treatment consists of bed rest, fluids, and acetaminophen for the fever. Parvoviruses have also been associated with aplastic anemia, arthritis, and spontaneous abortion in humans.

Dogs, wolves, and coyotes can become infected with canine parvovirus. Puppies are most susceptible to the virus, which causes diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. There was an outbreak of canine parvovirus in the United States in 1978, and it has become more common worldwide since then. Feline distemper, also called feline panleukopenia, an often fatal disease of cats, raccoons, and minks caused by a parvovirus, is characterized by fever, dehydration, loss of appetite, and a reduction in white blood cells. Annual vaccination against parvoviruses is routine in cats and dogs.

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parvovirus

[¦pär·vō′vī·rəs]
(virology)
The equivalent name for picodnavirus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since antigen-antibody complexes are not produced in persistent PV-B19, which results in chronic PRC aplasia, fifth disease does not develop.
'Fifth Disease rashes are caused by a virus, and usually resolve within one week but may reappear for up to three weeks on exposure to sunlight and heat.
The most commonly identified vital agent associated with rashes in school-aged children is parvovirus B19, which causes eryrhema infectiosum (i.e., fifth disease).
Fifth disease is caused by infection with human parvovirus B19.
It is now firmly connected to a number of disease processes, from the benign fifth disease or erythema infectiosum, to the more severe fetal infection and demise.
[1.] Erythema infectiosum fifth disease) is characterized by several days of high fever, migratory myalgias and arthralgias, lymphadenopathy, anemia, and the presence of a maculopapular rash that appears as the fever breaks.
About one week later, half of infected children get the typical fifth disease rash which starts with fiery red cheeks resembling sunburned or slapped cheeks.
Slapped cheek syndrome, sometimes called fifth disease due to a mild viral infection which can be confused with scarlet fever and German measles in children.
At the moment he is suffering from Fifth Disease. (See how advanced he is--he skipped right over Diseases One through Four!) Every now and then his face clouds over as he announces, to anyone and no one, "My face is all red!"
Just as we stow away the image of the lacy rash of Fifth disease, we also should stockpile parenting tidbits.
Also known as Parvovirus B19, or Fifth Disease, it is a common childhood illness.