filament


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filament,

in astronomy: see chromospherechromosphere
[Gr.,=color sphere], layer of rarefied, transparent gases in the solar atmosphere; it measures 6,000 mi (9,700 km) in thickness and lies between the photosphere (the sun's visible surface) and the corona (its outer atmosphere).
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Filament

A very thin tungsten wire inside an incandescent light. When heated, it glows and emits light.

filament

[′fil·ə·mənt]
(astronomy)
A prominence, seen as a dark marking on the solar disk.
(botany)
The stalk of a stamen which supports the anther.
A chain of cells joined end to end, as in certain algae.
(electricity)
Metallic wire or ribbon which is heated in an incandescent lamp to produce light, by passing an electric current through the filament.
(electronics)
A cathode made of resistance wire or ribbon, through which an electric current is sent to produce the high temperature required for emission of electrons in a thermionic tube. Also known as directly heated cathode; filamentary cathode; filament-type cathode.
(invertebrate zoology)
A single silk fiber in the cocoon of a silkworm.
(metallurgy)
A long, flexible metal wire drawn very fine.
(science and technology)
A long, flexible object with a small cross section.
(textiles)
A single continuous manufactured fiber which is extruded from a spinneret and joined with others to make a thread.

filament

An incandescent lamp filament whose form and construction are designated by a letter: S, straight wire; C, coil; CC, coiled coil.

filament

1. the thin wire, usually tungsten, inside a light bulb that emits light when heated to incandescence by an electric current
2. Electronics a high-resistance wire or ribbon, forming the cathode in some valves
3. a single strand of a natural or synthetic fibre; fibril
4. Botany
a. the stalk of a stamen
b. any of the long slender chains of cells into which some algae and fungi are divided
5. Ornithol the barb of a down feather
6. Anatomy any slender structure or part, such as the tail of a spermatozoon; filum
7. Astronomy
a. a long structure of relatively cool material in the solar corona
b. a long large-scale cluster of galaxies
References in periodicals archive ?
Last December, Lifetime Brands and housewares provider Filament Brands entered into a definitive agreement under which Lifetime will acquire Filament from middle market private equity firm Centre Partners in a cash and stock deal.
Continuing its thrust into the additive manufacturing printing arena, SABIC, Houston, has launched new filaments and is working on others.
85 mm diameters, nylon filament is a popular material for 3D printing because it is durable and strong, but retains some flexibility and is resistant to chemicals.
The researchers were able to replicate jets in their simulations that matched high-resolution filament observations from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission and the Hinode satellite operated jointly by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.
ASTRONOMERS HAVE discovered long filaments of cold gas--the main ingredient for making stars--cocooning giant bubbles inflated by a black hole.
The nominal diameter of all SABle's filament products is 1.
Countless other examples of technical applications for filament yarns span sectors such as medical, industrial, transport, engineering and protective clothing.
He expects that the most efficient way to disperse filaments within plastics is to sell batches of plastic pellets containing a "higher concentration of the filament than you would want in your final product.
In 2014, the contribution of filament nonwovens to the diaper market is estimated to be 128,800 tons while staple nonwovens are about 20,100 tons, making the total about 149,000 tons.
According to the sliding filament theory, during contraction the sets of thin filaments in each half of sarcomere are drawn toward the center of A band and subjected to sliding forces oriented in opposite directions[5-7] The sliding filament theory very well explained the shortening of skeletal muscle during contraction with reference to a single sarcomere with movement of Z discs toward center of that particular sarcomere.
But researchers could gain far more information about the web's structure from a quasar shining onto a nearby filament, which would then emit its own light, says astronomer Michael Ranch of the Carnegie Institution for Science in Pasadena, Calif.