filamentous bacteria


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filamentous bacteria

[‚fil·ə′men·təs bak′tir·ē·ə]
(microbiology)
Bacteria, especially in the order Actinomycetales, whose cells resemble filaments and are often branched.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
nov., strictly anaerobic, filamentous bacteria of the phylum Chloroflexi isolated from methanogenic propionate-degrading consortia," International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, vol.
However, it is important to highlight the presence and the relative abundance of filamentous bacteria, especially around 48 h in the control treatment.
These filamentous bacteria stain weakly positive with Fite's stain supporting the diagnosis of Nocardia species (yellow arrow) under low power (40x) (e) and high power (100x) (f).
Manel et al., "Induction of intestinal Th17 cells by segmented filamentous bacteria," Cell, vol.
Lecuyer et al., "The key role of segmented filamentous bacteria in the coordinated maturation of gut helper T cell responses," Immunity, vol.
The surfaces of the individual units of the structure are irregularly undulating, very similar to the modern filamentous bacteria. The diameter of this possible filamentous fossil is 0.2 [micro]m.
Recently, much attention has been paid to segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) because of its ability to induce the production and activation of Th17 cells in the intestine, with the secretion of interleukin-17 [23, 27].
Besides, the microscopic observation of floc characteristics and the identification and quantification of filamentous bacteria allow us to highlight disturbances within their community and to foresee the occurrence of specific dysfunctions, for example, sludge foaming, bulking, and solids washout [4,12-15].
Segmented filamentous bacteria are indigenous intestinal bacteria that activate intraepithelial lymphocytes and induce MHC class II molecules and fucosyl asialo GM1 glycolipids on the small intestinal epithelial cells in the ex-germ-free mouse.
Research note: isolation of two filamentous bacteria associated with enteritis in turkey poults.
are aerobic, grampositive, partial acid-fast, filamentous bacteria and ubiquitous environmental saprophytes responsible for granulomatous or suppurative infections (RIBEIRO et al., 2008).
In the molasses treatment, there was a positive relationship between coccoid bacteria adhered to the bioflocs and production time, while in the dextrose treatment this relationship occurred with increasing density of filamentous bacteria. The means for microorganisms of both treatments are presented in Table 3.