fillet

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fillet

1. a thin strip of ribbon, lace, etc., worn in the hair or around the neck
2. a narrow flat moulding, esp one between other mouldings
3. a narrow band between two adjacent flutings on the shaft of a column
4. a narrow strip of welded metal of approximately triangular cross-section used to join steel members at right angles
5. the top member of a cornice
6. Anatomy a band of sensory nerve fibres in the brain connected to the thalamus
7. another name for fairing

fillet

[′fil·ət or, of food, fə′lā]
(building construction)
A flat molding that separates rounded or angular moldings.
(design engineering)
A concave transition surface between two otherwise intersecting surfaces.
(engineering)
Any narrow, flat metal or wood member.
A corner piece at the juncture of perpendicular surfaces to lessen the danger of cracks, as in core boxes for castings.
(food engineering)
A boneless slice of meat or fish.

fillet

fillet, 1
1. A molding consisting of a narrow flat band, often square in section; the term is loosely applied to almost any rectangular molding; usually used in conjunction with or to separate other moldings or ornaments, as the stria between the flutes of columns. Also see band, lattice molding, fret, reglet, annulet, supercilium, taenia, cincture, cimbia, fascia, and platband; a listel, or tringle.
2. A carved ornament representing a flowing band or ribbon.
3. In stair construction, a thin narrow strip of wood which fits into the groove of the stair shoe or subrail between balusters.
4. A cant strip.
5. A concave junction where two surfaces meet. (See illustration p. 398.)

fillet

fillet
fillet
i. An increased area of pavement around turning points on the runway and the taxiway to ensure aircraft do not go off the pavement while turning.
ii. A fairing at the junction of two surfaces to improve the airflow and decrease the drag. A fillet gives shape and does not impart any additional strength.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several of the students are hoping to become professional chefs, and Wayne urged them to make good use of their new-found filleting skills.
QUICKFIRE: Wayne gives a filleting masterclass and, below, with a finished fish
A high-capacity freezing system was imported from Denmark to complete the transformation from a one-time small filleting factory into a first-rate industrial fish and seafood processor:
While the plant is highly automated, a good deal of hand filleting is carried out by its nimble-fingered workforce.
But I don't cook it myself much and, prior to a three-hour session on the country's first mobile fish filleting facility, I can't say I have ever considered how a fish caught in some sea, somewhere far away, got itself onto my plate - boneless - and into my greedy little belly.
The fish are then placed in the automatic filleting machine.
Yes, I did often fillet my big fish (meaning any that weighed a pound or two) but the filleting did not take place until after I had suffered through the same old ritual of scaling, beheading and gutting.
At the recent VIV Europe show, Stork PMT B.V., Boxmeer, the Nertherlands, received a VIV Award for its new FHF-XB front trait filleting system.