film

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film:

see motion picturesmotion pictures,
movie-making as an art and an industry, including its production techniques, its creative artists, and the distribution and exhibition of its products (see also motion picture photography; Motion Picture Cameras under camera).
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Film

 

a series of sequential photographic images, or frames, associated with a single subject and intended for reproduction on a screen.

In modern cinematography, the following classifications of films are used: feature motion pictures, television films, animated cartoons, newsreel and documentary films, scientific films, educational films, and amateur films. Other classifications correspond to thematic content (historical and adventure films and comedies), cinematographic and projection techniques (silent, sound, black-and-white, color, wide-screen, large-format, panoramic, stereoscopic, and multiscreen films), and projection duration (full-length and short films). Special-purpose films include microfilms, test films, advertising films, and souvenir films.

Most films are produced at specialized motion-picture studios by groups of artistic workers and technical specialists, who use a variety of cinematographic equipment while filming on the studio sets and on location. Films for scientific, technical, and educational purposes are often produced in the motion-picture laboratories of research institutes and educational institutions. Amateur films are usually made in amateur motion-picture studios at clubs, educational institutions, and enterprises, as well as by individual amateurs.

E. A. IOFIS

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about a film?

One way of examining parts of ourselves we do not wish to look at is to dream that we are seeing them portrayed in a film. Alternatively, it can mean escaping reality.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

film

[film]
(biology)
A thin, membranous skin, such as a pellicle.
(electricity)
The layer adjacent to the valve metal in an electrochemical valve, in which is located the high voltage drop when current flows in the direction of high impedance.
(graphic arts)
Plastic material, such as cellulose acetate or cellulose nitrate, coated with a light-sensitive emulsion, used to make negatives or transparencies in radiography or photography.
(materials)
A flat section of material that is extremely thin in comparison to its other dimensions and has a nominal maximum thickness of 250 micrometers and a lower limit of thickness of about 25 micrometers. Also known as self-supported film.
(medicine)
A pathological opacity, as of the cornea.
(metallurgy)
Oxide coating on a metal.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

film

A layer of one or more coats of paint or varnish covering an object or surface.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

film

1. 
a. a sequence of images of moving objects photographed by a camera and providing the optical illusion of continuous movement when projected onto a screen
b. a form of entertainment, information, etc., composed of such a sequence of images and shown in a cinema, etc.
c. (as modifier): film techniques
2. a thin flexible strip of cellulose coated with a photographic emulsion, used to make negatives and transparencies
3. Pathol an abnormally opaque tissue, such as the cornea in some eye diseases
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

film

Film is an analog method for recording still photos and moving images. Following Daguerreotype photography (see image), still image film was invented by George Eastman in 1885, who founded Eastman Kodak Company three years later.

Film is a strip of plastic coated with an emulsion of light-sensitive silver halide crystals. In monochrome film, the crystals absorb the light. In the development process, they become silver and block the light to become the black areas on the negative. Color film has layers of color sensitive dyes starting on top: blue; yellow to prevent blue leakage; green-blue and red-blue. In development, the color dyes are retained and combine to form the colored image.

Still Filming in the 21st Century
Some Hollywood movies are still shot on film; however, the term "filming" is occasionally used to mean shooting a digital video or movie. See film camera.


Roundhay Garden Scene (1888)
Not long after Eastman's invention, French inventor Louis Le Prince made a two-second silent "moving picture," considered to be the oldest surviving movie film.







In the Antique Shop
Kodak film, which is still being made, may some day be history. Years ago, signs such as this were everywhere, but this one was for sale in an antique shop.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
This film image released by Summit Entertainment shows Mackenzie Foy, left, and Kristen Stewart in a scene from "The 'Twilight Saga- Breaking Dawn Part 2'
One of the standards groups within NAPM conducted extensive research and testing and verified that residual thiosulfate in processed film can have a deleterious effect on silver film images. Experimentation and accelerated aging tests have made it possible to establish the maximum amount of residual thiosulfate that can be allowed to remain in various types of photographic film without seriously degrading the image over specified periods of time.
He evidently wanted to retain the film image more than he did the onanism.
A variety of things can cause this, she says, including an error in judgment by the radiologist, obstruction of a cancer sign by dense tissue, and a poorly exposed and displayed film image. "Any number of things must be perfect in order to get a good mammogram reading;' Fajardo says.
In Daisies, the director's own philosophy of filmmaking was complemented by that of her cinematographer, Jaroslav Kucera, who wanted the film image to escape from a strictly objective vocation.
By collaborating with radiologists to understand the demands of reading digital mammograms, Hologic created the R2 DigitalNow HD software, which adapts each digitized film image to a selected contrast and tissue intensity that models a digital mammography system.
The explosion is announced fractions of a second before it happens by a flashing signal recorded on the film image, which almost appears to come from the projection apparatus itself, and which unremittingly appears to bring down the building.
The committee warned people not to fall for the film image of rum-swilling swash-bucklers like that portrayed by Johnny Depp as Jack Sparrow in Pirates Of The Caribbean II.
Izabella Pruska-Oldenhof has made two photogram films (Light Magic, 2001; Song of the Firefly, 2002), in which objects placed on the film surface create the film image. In her carnal longings (2003) she explores the emulsion-lift technique, which involves lifting the emulsion off the film surface and re-adhering it.
Best Known For:Playing a variety of strong women on stage, TV and film Image: Feisty, husky voiced temptress Early Life: Born May 13, 1949, in New York, the daughter of acclaimed actors Charlotte Holland and Sam Wanamaker.
The 10-course final dinner served on the Titanic was recreated in the epic 1997 film Image Credit: GN Archives Rose wonders if she can stomach another course of squab in James Cameron's epic Titanic Image Credit: GN Archives By Keith J Fernandez, Editor - GN Focus