filmic

(redirected from filmically)
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filmic

having characteristics that are suggestive of films or the cinema
References in periodicals archive ?
Leni demonstrates here how a narrative of anxiety can be produced filmically without the need for elaborate narrative devices borrowed from history or literature.
As for how music functions filmically in the clip, Gurrumul's recording in general serves as a soundtrack to the moving images, although it is not as straightforward as this due to depictions of the singer performing.
For a guy who's known to be quite aggressive filmically, the laws of film are always being respected.
Stoddart's attempt to explain the "inablility to filmically replicated the written word" (102) in the numerous versions of The Great Gatsby to Ronald Berman's claim that the novel "is full of instructions on its own translation" into film (154).
The characters in Martin Cozza's filmically perspected and aptly titled "Pennsylvania Polka" move toward each other, then away from and back again, in a heartbreaking kind of dance.
Thus, through liturgically presenting the lives of this filmically chosen people, the lives of those in the audience become part of the litany of 'things that happen'--things happen all the time, and the film becomes a narrative hallowing of all these stories.
I have devised a series of presentations and workshops that clearly demonstrate that thinking filmically can help children to develop imaginative writing skills.
The moment that Laurita lets go of the mice corresponds filmically with her mother burning herself on the kettle, and both grab their hand with an identical motion, with tears in their eyes.
Filmically, the image reflects this rough, scrabbly existence, and the witnessing of Jocelyn's descent suggests a mix of pathos, tragedy, and waste.
Brokeback even suggests this filmically with tight shots of the heroes' faces as they fail to make a significant connection with almost anyone outside of their relationship, including their children.
His abduction of the frail, laudanum over-dosed and addicted, forty-year-old, marcescent spinster of Wimpole Street was his apogee, and it has been so ceaselessly replicated theatrically and filmically as to have become a virtual folkloric stereotype.
Jane says: "I think you should use 'filmically' instead of 'visually'", and the first is certainly less historically, that is poetically, charged than the second; but just because of that it seems nebulous, almost meaningless, in comparison to the second.