filter bubble


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filter bubble

Customized results from search engines and social media that are geared to the individual based on that person's past preferences. A filter bubble means two people searching for the same thing receive a different sequence of results. Proponents say this delivers a better user experience, while opponents claim the information is always slanted and does not provide a sufficient variety of opinions.

Filter bubbles most assuredly have polarized America with regards to politics, as people's opinions are reinforced on a daily basis. It would seem there are very few social media platforms, radio stations or TV channels that report both sides of a story with equal intensity.


The Filter Bubble
Eli Pariser coined the term. In his 2011 book, he cited an earlier Google announcement that it would start using some 57 signals to determine the results it reports to users.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This is very similar to what happens with filter bubbles (Pariser, 2011) and echo chambers on social media in general and on Facebook in particular.
Indeed, the ways in which algorithms have segmented elements of society into their own "filter bubbles" has resulted in a scenario where the very essence of truth is now in question.
While the app will enable users to get "personalized" news, it will also include top stories for all readers, aiming to break the so-called filter bubble of information designed to reinforce people's biases.
The result would be to burst the social media filter bubble by rounding out our experience around news and current issues, introducing more variety into the information flow that feeds our intuition, judgment, decisions, and behavior.
The social-media giant is being criticized for the way its algorithms conspire to cocoon each user inside a "filter bubble," surrounding people with content that rarely challenges their worldview, including too many false news reports that often fail to get debunked.
This phenomenon reduces information diversity and keeps individuals in their information bubble, which explains the term "Filter Bubble" (12).
Even so, Abram acknowledges, "Most information flow is gate-kept by sometimes biased or selective media organizations...." No one's filter bubble is totally pure, but is influenced by that person's social networks, beliefs, worldview, and the like.
You've likely been told that Facebook paves the way for a "filter bubble," or an "echo chamber." (1) This argument suggests that since Facebook is trying to optimize for content you see, you'll never see opposing views.
On top of that, your filter bubble (more on this later) is rarely "pure," and it's influenced by your own social networks, search behaviors, beliefs, background, education, and worldview.