findspot

findspot

[′fīnd‚spät]
(archeology)
The place where an archeological object has been found.
References in periodicals archive ?
When it is clear that an antiquity is of Indian origin and even from a particular area such as Mathura region, Amaravati region, Rajasthan, Central India or from a particular school of art such as Pala, Sena, Sunga, Kushan etc., what would change about the antiquity if the exact findspot is known?
About 250 m south of the findspot, the klint bay is bordered by the steep North Estonian Klint.
of 13342 and discovered in an unknown findspot in Anatolia was one of the most outstanding antic catheters (9) (Figure 1).
An initial investigation of the findspot by the National Museum turned into an important research excavation and community archaeology project.
She advocates the full and consistent itemization of both findspot data and ownership history of all works discussed along with the name, date, material, and present whereabouts that are already always itemized; the foregrounding of artworks about which scholars have more contextual data over objects about which they have little or none; and an increased attention to the modern reception history of canonical but archaeologically undocumented objects.
Provenience, today an archaeological term connoting an object's "findspot" and attendant context, and provenance were at one point all but interchangeable in the American academic lexicon.
The excavated material is organized into type of figurine, findspot, and material, with detailed discussion of ceramic production.
Ridley, "The Finding of the Esquiline Silver Treasure: An Unpublished Letter," Antiquaries Journal 76 (1996): 215-22, confirmed Shelton's identification of the treasure's findspot.
(97) The findspot was at the north edge of a dense artifact scatter east of the modern village of Examilia.
Lawrence Island have been an abundant source of old ivory and the main findspot of the rare Okvik figurines now coveted so highly on the art market.
It is named after its findspot, where it was put to use in the binding of a book.(24) Internal evidence makes clear that the text served educational needs, perhaps at Beirut, perhaps elsewhere.
'Grey antiquities' have either been on the market since before there were cultural property laws in place, or for so long that any findspot documentation has long been lost.