fine art


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Wikipedia.

fine art

1. art produced chiefly for its aesthetic value, as opposed to applied art
2. any of the fields in which such art is produced, such as painting, sculpture, and engraving
www.fine-art.com
www.tate.org.uk
www.vam.ac.uk
www.royalacademy.org.uk
www.nationalgallery.org.uk
www.metmuseum.org
www.louvre.fr/louvrea.htm
www.rijksmuseum.nl
www.guggenheim.org
References in classic literature ?
And, as the writer of the article which started this train of thought says with lovable warmth, the sailing of yachts is a fine art.
Second, I suggest that all men and women, and boys and girls, who have so acquainted themselves with the essentials of the fine art of animal-training, should become members of, and ally themselves with, the local and national organizations of humane societies and societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals.
But there is a lightness about the feminine mind--a touch and go--music, the fine arts, that kind of thing--they should study those up to a certain point, women should; but in a light way, you know.
The most thoroughgoing of all distinctions in literature, as in the other Fine Arts, is that between (1) Substance, the essential content and meaning of the work, and (2) Form, the manner in which it is expressed (including narrative structure, external style, in poetry verse-form, and many related matters).
The man of the Fancy Repository and Brompton Emporium of Fine Arts (of whom she bought the screens, vainly hoping that he would repurchase them when ornamented by her hand) can hardly hide the sneer with which he examines these feeble works of art.
I hate business and men of business; and as to social questions, I have only one article of belief, which is, that the sole refiner of human nature is fine art."
Richard was bending and bowing and scraping and walking backward, just as if he had that high and mighty minister, the under-secretary for fine arts, before him.
The cultivation of the fine arts appeared to necessitate, to her mind, a great deal of byplay, a great standing off with folded arms and head drooping from side to side, stroking of a dimpled chin with a dimpled hand, sighing and frowning and patting of the foot, fumbling in disordered tresses for wandering hair-pins.
His library, in addition to numerous works on philosophy and the fine arts, was composed of standard books of all classes, including, of course, a proportion of nautical literature.
Perhaps the reason I used to enjoy going to the Academy of Fine Arts in New York was because there were but a few hundred paintings in it, and it did not surfeit me to go through the list.
And Sir Leicester is glad to repose in dignified contentment before the great fire in the library, condescendingly perusing the backs of his books or honouring the fine arts with a glance of approbation.
He described his indifference to politics, his love of study, of the fine arts, of science, and of flowers.