fennel

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fennel

fennel, common name for several perennial herbs, genus Foeniculum vulgare of the family Umbelliferae (parsley family), related to dill. The strawlike foliage and the seeds are licorice-scented and are used (especially in Italian cooking) for flavoring. Sweet fennel, or finocchio, is a variety with a thick, bulb-based stalk eaten like celery. In literature and legend fennel is a symbol of flattery, a remedy for failing eyesight, and an aphrodisiac. Its inflorescence is a flat-topped umbel of yellow florets. Fennel-flower, a member of the buttercup family, also produces aromatic seeds. The dog fennels are members of the family Asteraceae (aster family). Fennel is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Apiales, family Umbelliferae.
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fennel

fennel

A famous edible seasoning that calms the digestive and nervous system while activating digestive juices- great for anyone with gas, flatulence, indigestion, hard time digesting food, use plant seeds with strong aroma- like fennel seeds, anise seeds, dill seeds, cumin seeds, mustard seeds… aromatic seeds activate digestive fire. Fennel leaf tea lowers blood pressure without reducing heart rate. Seeds increase libido and milk production. Seeds also used as “licorice” because of the anise taste. Used for coughs and colic in children. Helps cancer patients rebuild digestive system after radiation and chemotherapy. Also used for kidneys, liver, spleen, lungs. Grows up to 7 feet tall (2.5m) Be careful not to confuse fennel with poison hemlock! Fennel has yellowish flowers and a licorice smell, while poison hemlock has white flowers, smells bad and has purple splotches on the stem. Yellow fennel flowers are eye candy with a subtle licorice flavor, much like the herb itself. Seeds can be easily stored and used in salads, soups, dressings. Fennel takes away appetite, so taking some before meals helps you eat less. Do not eat while pregnant.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz

fennel

[′fen·əl]
(botany)
Foeniculum vulgare. A tall perennial herb of the family Umbelliferae; a spice is derived from the fruit.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fennel

1. a strong-smelling yellow-flowered umbelliferous plant, Foeniculum vulgare, whose seeds and feathery leaves are used to season and flavour food
2. another name for mayweed
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005