forest fire

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forest fire:

see forestryforestry,
the management of forest lands for wood, water, wildlife, forage, and recreation. Because the major economic importance of the forest lies in wood and wood products, forestry has been chiefly concerned with timber management, especially reforestation, maintenance of
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.

fire, forest:

see forestryforestry,
the management of forest lands for wood, water, wildlife, forage, and recreation. Because the major economic importance of the forest lies in wood and wood products, forestry has been chiefly concerned with timber management, especially reforestation, maintenance of
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Forest fire

The term wildfire refers to all uncontrolled fires that burn surface vegetation (grass, weeds, grainfields, brush, chaparral, tundra, and forest and woodland); often these fires also involve structures. In addition to the wildfires, several million acres of forest land are intentionally burned each year under controlled conditions to accomplish some silvicultural or other land-use objective or for hazard reduction.

Most wildfires are caused by human beings, directly or indirectly. In the United States less than 10% of all such fires are caused by lightning, the only truly natural cause. In the West (the 17 Pacific and Rocky Mountain states) lightning is the primary cause, with smoking (cigarettes, matches, and such) the second most frequent. Combined they account for 50 to 75% of all wildfires. In the 13 southern states (Virginia to Texas) the primary cause is incendiary. This combined with smoking and debris burning make up 75% of the causes. The 20 eastern states have smoking and debris burning as causing close to 50% of all wildfires. Miscellaneous causes of wildfires are next in importance in most regions. The other causes of wildfires are machine use and campfires. Machine use includes railroads, logging, sawmills, and other operations using equipment.

The manner in which fuel ignites, flame develops, and fire spreads and exhibits other phenomena constitutes the field of fire behavior. Factors determining forest fire behavior may be considered under four headings: attributes of the fuel, the atmosphere, topography, and ignition. A forest fire may burn primarily in the crowns of trees and shrubs (a crown fire); primarily in the surface litter and loose debris of the forest floor and small vegetation (a surface fire); or in the organic material beneath the surface litter (a ground fire). The most common type is a surface fire.

The U.S. Forest Service has developed a National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) to provide fire-control personnel with numerical ratings to help them with the tasks of fire-control planning and the suppression of specific fires. The system includes three basic indexes: an occurrence index, a burning index, and a fire load index. Each of these is related to a specific part of the fire-control job. These indexes are used by dispatchers in making decisions on setting up firefighting forces, lookout systems, and so forth.

forest fire

[′fär·əst ‚fīr]
(forestry)
Uncontrolled combustion of forest fuels.
References in periodicals archive ?
The contract work is in the field of forest harvesting, timber harvesting, silviculture, nursery work, selection and seed production, forest protection, conservation p / fire, forest maintenance facilities.
The contract work is in the field of forest harvesting, Forest harvesting, silviculture, nursery work, selection and seed production, forest protection, conservation p / fire, forest maintenance.
Without fire, forests will suffer severe insect and disease attacks.