fire limits

fire limits

A boundary line establishing an area in which there exists, or is likely to exist, a fire hazard requiring special fire protection.
References in periodicals archive ?
He shared that fire limits are set against values in the simplest way: For example, if your largest building has replacement cost and rents of $100 million, $100 million may be your limit.
Limits: Generally, up to $1 million master-policy fire limits are readily available.
Only eleven months after its adoption, the act was repealed in favour of another one, in which a simple distinction was created between buildings erected within the fire limits of 1850 and those located outside it.
In addition to modifying the fire limits, the new text included a clause on structures that had been defined as belonging to the fifth class in 1850.
53) The intersection of geographic and functional differentiation was now addressed explicitly: construction was subjected to distinct rules inside and outside fire limits, and residential and non-residential construction were treated differently within these limits.
The graphic representation did not replace the textual definition of the fire limits, but it did give the reader a concrete impression of the spatial differentiation that the bylaw operated.
The appended sentence stipulates that the fire limits could be extended "on petition of two-thirds of the rate-payers on the Street or portion of the Street proposed to be included, who represent half in value of the assessment on the Street or part of a Street so to be included.
In addition, fire limits of each class now applied to several areas.
Until that time, lumberyards had been allowed within fire limits A only if there remained at least then feet of space between them and surrounding buildings.
The code of 1890 shows the growing complexity of building regulations; it contains seventy-seven sections occupying over twenty-one pages, plus a six-page verbal description of fire limits.
86) The process of differentiation and specification culminated in the new building code of 1904, with its 154 sections, occupying close to a hundred pages, and its nine-page description of fire limits.
In squabbling over fire limits ordinances, for instance, some property owners contended that public good justified such an obvious assault on property rights.