fire point


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fire point

[′fīr ‚pȯint]
(chemistry)
The lowest temperature at which a volatile combustible substance vaporizes rapidly enough to form above its surface an air-vapor mixture which burns continuously when ignited by a small flame.

fire point

1. See flash point.
2. The temperature at which a fuel’s vapors will sustain ignition.

fire point

The temperature at which a substance, such as lubricating oil, will give off a vapor that will burn continuously after ignition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fire point of the enemy was silenced by the retaliatory fire.
Residents living several kilometres away from the fire point at the Isheri community and Kudeyibu Estate scampered from their homes in panic as the flames escalated and spread close to a gas station in the area.
The first temporary fire point at Expo 2020 Dubai will be ready for operation by 30 September, a senior official said on Saturday during a visit to the Expo 2020 Dubai Office.
Compared to mineral oil, the relatively high fire point and low calorific value of esters mean that they will not sustain fire under all transformer fault conditions.
The situation is under control, authorities say, as the fire crews keep wetting down the fire point between the hull layers.
The new lubricant is said to have a high flash and fire point, good anti-wear characteristics and excellent thermal and oxidative stability to reduce chain and sprocket wear.
The new lubricant has a high flash and fire point, excellent anti-wear characteristics and excellent thermal and oxidative stability to reduce chain and sprocket wear.
They then calmly led the 12 able-bodied residents to the safety of a covered fire point in the car park.
The Petrotest CLA 5 Cleveland open cup flash point and fire point analyzer from AMETEK Petrolab Co.
"The new fluids have a much higher flash and fire point," he says.
An engineering bulletin describes HE high flash and fire point heat transfer fluid, which is said to provide precise, uniform process temperature control to 600 [degrees] F in liquid-phase closed-loop heat transfer systems.