firedog

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firedog

One of a pair of supports for logs in a fireplace; also called an andiron.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The V&A offered to make the firedogs available as a loan or as a reproduction but this offer has not yet been taken up by a local museum or the present-day owners of Gwydir Castle.
Back in the 16th century, log fires and firedogs were a familiar sight in every home.
Chicago Firedogs were introduced to foodservice earlier this summer, and are currently being launched at retail.
Chicago Firedogs look innocent, but they are hot, hot, hot.
The first exhibition solely devoted to 18th-century French chaser-gilder Pierre Gouthiere brings together 21 of his opulent works, from vases and firedogs to the elaborate window knob pictured here.
This year, 31 of them were officially incorporated into the collection, as part gift and part purchase: they include firedogs, jars, vases, clocks, and a pair of gilt-bronze candelabra attributed to Boulle that are ornamented with sphinxes, rams' heads, and classical profiles.
A pair of gilded bronze firedogs made for this room during the following decade take the form of kneeling camels, while the painted boiseries feature turbaned figures alongside familiar neo-classical motifs.
For sheer sculptural bravura, I single out the pair of serpentine rococo gilt-bronze chenets or firedogs, decorated with figures of tritons with flowing beards and tresses and curling fishtails, blowing on their conch horns to calm or raise the waves.
Silver firedogs crowned with cupids are cited by Shakespeare in A Winter's Tale and an inventory of the apartments of James I'S queen, Anne of Denmark, fists sconces and other furnishings of silver.
Take the pair of silvered bronze firedogs made in the style of the late seventeenth century that ornamented the fireplace of the Grand Salon.