firing pin


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firing pin

[′fīr·iŋ ‚pin]
(ordnance)
A device used in the firing mechanism of a gun, mine, bomb, fuse, projectile, or the like, which strikes and detonates a sensitive explosive to initiate an explosive train or a propelling charge.
References in periodicals archive ?
The key is "don't get in over your head," and make sure you match the original firing pin length or, if it's worn, make yours a bit longer so you can shorten it to fit as needed.
Two-lug actions will always be easier to cock than three-lug actions because they give us more leverage by using all 90 degrees of movement to cock the firing pin, so we feel less resistance from the firing pin spring.
If you had not already replaced the firing pin back into the bolt body, do so now, sliding it all the way forward.
A: Because the free-floating firing pin of the M16/AR-15 is not as heavy as those in the Ml Garand and M14 autoloading rifles, slam-firing and muzzle-bump firing is less common in it; however, the danger does exist.
A gunsmith can thread and chamber a barrel, make a firing pin, mill a scope base from a block of steel, sweat on a front sight and inlet a stock.
On bolt actions it's relatively easy to arrange for the safety to hold the firing pin back.
Crewmen, proper firing pin maintenance is crucial to making sure your M777A2 howitzers keep throwing rounds down range.
In centerfire revolvers the firing pin itself may be attached to the hammer, or it may be housed in the frame and the hammer blow transferred to the firing pin and thence to the primer.
The whole purpose of the mainspring and hammer is to provide sufficient acceleration to the firing pin. In other words, change the velocity of the firing pin from rest to fast enough such that the amount of firing pin motion is sufficient for igniting the primer.
I know you have to pull the trigger to release the firing pin so it can fire, but is the "cocked" state enough to cause a chambered round to fire if the firing pin falls on its own?
Q I noticed the primers in ammo fired in one of my 9mm auto pistols were struck off center by the firing pin. Is this common?