business

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business

1. an industrial, commercial, or professional operation; purchase and sale of goods and services
2. a commercial or industrial establishment, such as a firm or factory
3. commercial activity; dealings (esp in the phrase do business)
4. volume or quantity of commercial activity
5. commercial policy or procedure
6. Theatre an incidental action, such as lighting a pipe, performed by an actor for dramatic effect
7. a group of ferrets
References in periodicals archive ?
Public and private firms follow different patterns with respect to firm growth and leverage, which makes them differentially sensitive to financial shocks.
FIRM GROWTH & EXPANSION--16% OF RESPONDENTS SAY THEY ARE CURRENTLY INVESTING OR PLANNING TO INVEST OUTSIDE OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA
1) achieving market outperformance is a laudable goal, but it doesn't directly impact firm growth in a significant way
Hypothesis 1: High internal social capital of the board will have a negative effect on firm growth.
The strong relationship between realized firm growth and growth intentions (e.g., Baum & Locke, 2004; Davidsson, 1989; Delmar & Wiklund, 2008) allows us to translate arguments from firm growth literature into explanations of growth expectations.
In this study, we propose a law of the newly formulated firm growth derived from short-term statistical laws.
Firm growth is a central topic in the literature on entrepreneurship, strategic management and industrial organization, among others.
The contributions that make up the main body of the text are devoted to innovation and imitation as entry wedges that lead to firm growth, the role of entrepreneur alternative issue interpretations on firm growth intentions, and a wide variety of other related subjects.
If the compensation for junior partners increases too fast, too soon, it can have a dampening effect on their motivation, particularly in the early years of a plan when generating firm growth is most important.
The trend was in line with an update last week of the OECD's forecasts for the major economies, which flagged an improving outlook led by firm growth in the United States and Japan while Europe was also seen at last joining the recovery.
Applying insights from the generational perspective, this study explores when strategic planning and succession planning are most conducive to privately held family firm growth. The results show that the degree to which strategic planning and succession planning are associated with family firm growth depends on the generation managing the firm.
Davidsson (Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research) and Wiklund (entrepreneurship, Syracuse University) bring together contributors from Sweden, the UK, and Australia to explore the relationships between factors that enhance firm growth. The book begins with an integrative model of small business growth, useful for understanding why and how firms grow.