first law of motion


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first law of motion

[′fərst ‚lȯ əv ′mō·shən]
(mechanics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
NNM's First Law of Motion: Every object in a state of uniform motion (or in a state of uniform rotation, or at rest) tends to remain in that state of motion (or in a state of uniform rotation, or at rest) unless an external force is applied to it; otherwise the law of conservation of energy will be destroyed.
"I'm pretty sure Sir Isaac would have loved to see this, as it would have proved his first law of motion to be correct," he added.
Our rule of displacement, which we shall call the "balanced displacement" (BD) rule, may be considered as the equivalent of Newton's first law of motion since it tells that points can not change their state of motion independently ...
The First Law of Motion is the law of inertia: "A body remains at rest, or if in motion, it remains in uniform motion with constant speed in a straight line, unless it is acted on by an unbalanced external force."
Whose first law of motion states that a body remains at rest, or in motion with a constant velocity, unless acted on by an external force?
NEWTON'S FIRST LAW OF MOTION, also known as the principle of inertia, says "Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed." (1) I will argue that inertia is an inherent principle and that inertia and Newton's First Law are in this way natural in the Aristotelian sense.
Participants learned that an actor's movements onstage were more effective when they followed Newton's First Law of Motion (inertia and momentum: a body will either remain at rest or in motion unless acted upon by an outside force).
Sir Isaac Newton's First Law of Motion states that an object at rest tends to stay at rest and that an object in motion tends to stay in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.
ASK any paratrooper how softly he lands while parachuting and he'll quickly explain Sir Isaac Newton's First Law of Motion: "An object in motion will remain in motion until an external force is applied." In other words, something has to stop the movement.
Newton's First Law of Motion states that unless acted upon by an external force, a body at rest will remain at rest and a body in motion will remain in motion.
Newton's first law of motion states, "Every object in a state of uniform motion tends to remain in that state of motion, unless an external force is applied to it." Folks, your car is not equipped with an ejection seat to get you out a nanosecond before a crash.
Sir Issac Newton's first law of motion comes into play here.