first-generation computer

first-generation computer

[¦fərst jen·ə¦rā·shən kəm′pyüd·ər]
(computer science)
A computer from the earliest stage of computer development, ending in the early 1960s, characterized by the use of vacuum tubes, the performance of one operation at a time in strictly sequential fashion, and elementary software, usually including a program loader, simple utility routines, and an assembler to assist in program writing.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

first-generation computer

A computer that used vacuum tubes as switching elements; for example, the UNIVAC I. See computer generations.
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References in periodicals archive ?
class="MsoNormalI am sure in the spirit of keeping jobs the Cotu boss no longer holds onto the old typewriters, copy typists and first-generation computers in his office or corresponds through postal services like in the 1970s.
Though their products are now bought by millions of people around the world, in 1976 the company's bosses - Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak and Ron Wayne - hand-made just 200 of the first-generation computers. "We really couldn't believe our eyes," said a staff member at the recycling centre.
Today it's supercomputing and LANS; five years ago it was microcomputing; ten years ago it was microprocessing; 15 years ago it was virtual systems; 20 years ago it was minicomputing; 25 years ago it was third-generation computers; 30 years ago it was second-generation computers; and 35 years ago it was first-generation computers.