first-generation computer

first-generation computer

[¦fərst jen·ə¦rā·shən kəm′pyüd·ər]
(computer science)
A computer from the earliest stage of computer development, ending in the early 1960s, characterized by the use of vacuum tubes, the performance of one operation at a time in strictly sequential fashion, and elementary software, usually including a program loader, simple utility routines, and an assembler to assist in program writing.

first-generation computer

A computer that used vacuum tubes as switching elements; for example, the UNIVAC I. See computer generations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though their products are now bought by millions of people around the world, in 1976 the company's bosses - Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak and Ron Wayne - hand-made just 200 of the first-generation computers.
Today it's supercomputing and LANS; five years ago it was microcomputing; ten years ago it was microprocessing; 15 years ago it was virtual systems; 20 years ago it was minicomputing; 25 years ago it was third-generation computers; 30 years ago it was second-generation computers; and 35 years ago it was first-generation computers.