first-order reaction


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first-order reaction

[¦fərst ‚ȯrd·ər rē′ak·shən]
(physical chemistry)
A chemical reaction in which the rate of decrease of concentration of component A with time is proportional to the concentration of A.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the reaction can be seen as a first-order reaction [4, 6, 20], Since the p-nitrophenol concentration of feed solution is proportional to the intensity of absorption peak at 400 nm, the rate constant [k.sub.app] can be calculated by the following equation:
Before computing the c-t curves, the first-order reaction mechanism, A [right arrow] B, an initial guess of the rate constants, and the educt starting concentration were defined as boundary conditions [53].
The results demonstrate that anaerobic digestion of kitchen waste can be described and predicted by the first-order reaction model.
It is assumed that oil shale pyrolysis is a first-order reaction, so the kinetic equation of oil shale pyrolysis can be described by the following equation:
At present, most researchers hold that the catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change.
The above results indicate that the photocatalytic reaction of MO aqueous solution follows the first-order reaction kinetics, which is consistent with the research results of Gao et al.
This overestimation of k is evidenced when observing Figure 3, in which the line that describes the first-order reaction is below the data obtained and the lined fitted from the other evaluated models, particularly in the samples taken closer to the exit from filters (HRT = 0.95 and 1.05 day in UAF and DAF).
For species transport model, ozone deposition was simulated by the first-order reaction of ozone with surfaces of leakage paths.
A first-order reaction will yield a straight line when the data are plotted, as illustrated in figure 1 (ref.
From the slope of this graph, the first-order reaction rate of [H.sup.[dot]] radical abstraction can be determined.
How long will it take for 50 percent of a substrate to disappear in a first-order reaction if it has a reaction rate constant of 0.4 [week.sup.-1]?

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