fish liver oil


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fish liver oil

[′fish ‚liv·ər ‚ȯil]
(materials)
An oil extracted from certain fish livers and containing vitamin A; high-potency livers are obtained from cod, shark, and halibut; used in medicine and as a dietary supplement.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cu levels in all of the cartilaginous fish liver oils were lower than the limits reported by Oehlenschlager (2002) which provides further evidence that fish liver oil can be considered safe to consume.
This is because fish liver oil contains high levels of vitamin A, like liver and liver products such as liver pate.
Don't confuse fish body oils with fish liver oils, such as cod liver oil.
However, it's vital you don't confuse fish body oils with fish liver oils, such as cod liver oil.
It's found naturally in fatty fish (salmon, tuna), fish liver oils (think cod liver oil), egg yolks, beef liver, and some mushrooms exposed to light.
It is also occurs naturally in a few foods, including some fish, fish liver oils, and egg yolks.
(Liver and fish liver oils have exceedingly high amounts but should be avoided by women of child-bearing age).
Natural sources are tuna, mackerel, salmon, fish liver oils, beef liver, egg yolk and cheese.
Sources: Fish liver oils, fatty fish, fortified milk products and fortified cereals.
SENSIBLE SUPPLEMENTS VITAMIN D can be found naturally in a small number of foods including oily fish, fish liver oils, animal liver, eggs and butter, as well as fortified sources such as margarine, breakfast cereals, yoghurts and milk - although UK milk isn't routinely fortified.
Although few foods contained significant amounts of vitamin D, important sources in the diet could include fatty fish, such as salmon or tuna, fish liver oils and eggs.
Vitamin D is produced by the body in response to sunlight and it also occurs naturally in a few forms including some fish, fish liver oils and egg yolk and also in fortified dairy and grain products.