Caryota

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Caryota

 

a genus of plants of the family Palmae. They are tall palms (up to 25 m) that die after fruitage. The leaves are bipin-nate, approximately 6.5 m long, with small cuneate segments. The flowers are in very large racemose inflorescences (approximately 3.5 m long). The fruit is berry-like. There are approximately 12 species, growing in India, Sri Lanka, Indochina, China (in Yunan), the Malay Archipelago, the Solomon Islands, and tropical Australia. Sugar is obtained from the juice of the inflorescences of several species, including the jaggery palm (Caryota urens) and the species C. mitis; the juice is made into wine. Starch is obtained from the heartwood of the trunks. The wood of many species is used in construction. Fiber from the leaves is used to make rope and other articles.

References in periodicals archive ?
Fishtail palm is attacked by diamond scale insect (Phaeochoropsis species) destroyed chlorophyll and creating brown dead areas.
The project aims to identify the diseases of various ornamental plants including Fishtail palm, lady palm, foxtail palm, wall palm, Alexandra palm and fishtail palm etc.
Although some research work has already been done on the certain diseases of fishtail palm.
This study was conducted at a nursery in Kea'au, HI (island of Hawai'i) from February to April 2008 using seedling fishtail palms (15.
When the plants were taken out of their pots for inspection at 14 DAT, the fishtail palms were found to be severely root-bound, which may have affected the extent of heat conduction between hot water, potting media, and ants, possibly accounting for the lower ant mortality rate observed in these palms.