fission fragments

fission fragments

[′fish·ən ‚frag·məns]
(nucleonics)
The nuclear species first produced when an atom such as uranium-238 or plutonium-239 undergoes fission. Also known as primary fission products.
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This reaction results in two high energy fission fragments (FF), around 166 MeV in total [10], which subsequently are emitted in opposite directions.
Sub-chamber containing the uranium inside becomes unstable on accepting the neutron and fissions to produce stable fission fragments. The fission reaction is maintained subcriticai to ensure that when fusion is shut down, fission is also stopped (correlative fission).
Enclosing the reactors by injecting lead and encasing them in concrete would make it safe to work and live a few kilometres away from the site, but is not a long-term solution for the disposal of spent fuel, which will decay and emit fission fragments over several thousand years.
When U-235 or Pu-239 atoms fission, they split into two smaller fission fragments in any of approximately 40 ways for each isotope, resulting in "[s]omething like 80 different fission fragments" for U-235 or Pu-239.
It was quickly realized that the two new fission fragments would fly apart with very high energy and that extra neutrons produced in this process would lead to a continuous chain reaction.
The total kinetic energy of fission fragments of [U.sup.235] or [Pu.sup.239] is found experimentally 20-60 MeV less than Q-value predicted by [DELTA][mc.sup.2].
The fission fragments fly apart with great energy and also emit more neutrons.
Topics include development of the photonuclear activation file, nuclear data for minor actinides, differential cross sections of complex particle emission reactions, Monte Carlo simulation of the fission fragments evaporation process, random matrix theory in statistical analysis of resonances, and nuclear data services.
"Fission fragments go bombing out of the material and create defect tracks." Although protons penetrate much farther than ions, they tend to make the material radioactive.
It was those small acids that, after the explosion and the release of radioactive substances, served as efficient coagulators, transporting radioactive particles and fission fragments."
"When the uranium atom decays, it produces two fission fragments. These fission fragments are like bullets fired into the carbon structure.
To do it, the reactor fuel has to be arranged so that the fission fragments can escape.